Specials of the Week

Every week (or so) I feature a plant at a special price. You can sign up to be notified so you will never miss an offer. Browse at your leisure through my archive of previous specials below. — Barry
Allium cernuum
The Genus Allium is home to hundreds of species including the gastronomically popular Allium cepa (Onions) and Allium sativum (Garlic), not to mention all of the ornamental varieties, and there are an abundance. There isn’t a moment during the gardening season that one or more species of Allium isn’t abloom in my garden. Such a plethora of colors, textures, shapes, forms and sizes! What a useful family of plants! And speaking of families, the genus Allium once found itself at home in the family Liliaceae, but now has a family of its own, Alliaceae.

In botanical Latin, the specific epithet cernuum means nodding and is quite appropriately applied in naming Allium cernuum whose common name is “Nodding Onion”. In my garden, this lovely, soft pink, graceful plant has been blooming for the last two weeks of July thru the first week of August and shows no sign of letting up. I primarily grow it in full sun, but it doesn’t seem to mind full shade either.

Allium cernuum is native to every state in the US except for 5 – http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=ALCE2 so you know that it’s super hardy and seems to tolerate just about any soil type although it probably wouldn’t be very happy in a wet situation.

Alliums increase by forming new bulbs and your plants will increase in size happily every year. It’s also easy to grow from seed and seems to have no predators, insect, pest or disease problems.

There are still limited quantities of Allium tuberosum, Allium stellatumAllium pulchellum ssp carinatumAllium senescensAllium senescens glaucum, Allium pulchellum ssp carinatum album, Allium triquetrum and Alliumcyathophorum var. farreri available, but for now………………..

I have loads of Allium cernuum to share with you.

What you’ll receive are bareroot, blooming size, 3 year old plants in active growth. They’ll come wrapped in pre-moistened, long fibered, unmilled sphagnum moss. This material is antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral and a very useful material to recycle. If you’d rather have them arrive in their pots, please add $.95 per plant to cover the extra cost of shipping..

The prices shown below include FREE SHIPPING on bareroot plants out of their 2″ pots. If you would like to receive the plants undisturbed, in their pots, please add .95¢ per plant to cover the extra cost of shipping soil and pots.

7   for $ 35.00  delivered ($5.00 ea)
10  for $ 45.00  delivered ($4.50 ea)
15  for $ 60.00  delivered ($4.00 ea)
20  for $ 70.00  delivered ($3.50 ea)
50  for $150.00  delivered ($3.00 ea)

Larger quantities at even lower prices upon request.

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just fill out the order form at http://www.sunfarm.com/orderform.pdf

Carex laxiculmis
I’m sooooo very tired of seeing acres of that ubiquitous Liriope used by landscape architects with no imagination at all. While I’ll admit that there are a few attractive, variegated forms of this Asian native that have come to be known commonly as “Lily Turf”, their hardiness is questionable and they don’t do very well in the shade.

Like an answer to a prayer, in comes our native sedge, Carex laxiculmis!

Carex laxiculmis is native to almost every state east of the Mississippi and most of eastern Canada. You’ve probably walked over or around it on a hike in the woods and didn’t notice it there amongst the rocks and tree roots.

The image I’ve chosen to share with you today is not a beautifully groomed, suburban landscape job. Rather, it is an illustration of, and tribute to, the extreme conditions that this useful plant can withstand. Talk about “Low Maintenance”, this plant is “NO Maintenance”!! The location is thin soil in deep shade on a south facing hillside on my farm. These nearly barren, dry woods have had no significant rainfall or watering for over 8 weeks and the plants still look good.

Given a lawn or garden setting, Carex laxiculmis is quick to fill in a bare area and can take bright sun with a bit of occasional watering and a good mulch, or light to deep shade with no attention at all. It’s very easy to divide and make new plants.

Soooo many folks come to me looking for grass-like plants to grow in the shade. It seems that we haven’t gotten over the love of lawns that we’ve grown up with, even though we can all admit to their being ecologically detrimental to the environment.

Since this evergreen plant is so low growing, it NEVER needs mowing and NEVER takes on an unsightly appearance at any time of the year.

I’m confident that you’ll find multiple uses for this great plant in your home gardens and landscape and I look forward to sharing it with you and to hearing back from you about your experiences with it.

I’ve a good bit of some most generous, bareroot divisions of Carex laxiculmis to share with you and shipping is FREE, pricing follows:

7  for $ 35.00  delivered ($5.00 ea)
10  for $ 45.00  delivered ($4.50 ea)
15  for $ 60.00  delivered ($4.00 ea)
20  for $ 70.00  delivered ($3.50 ea)
50  for $150.00  delivered ($3.00 ea)

Larger quantities at even lower prices upon request.

If you have any questions about this plant or any of the other plants that I offer, send an email to my personal email address – barry@sunfarm.com and I’ll reply as quickly as I can. If you’d like a return phone call, please include your phone # and the best time to call.

And, if you don’t have the time or desire to plant them at this point in time, you can still reserve them for a later ship date by specifying that date in a space provided on our order form. Please circle the ship date in red crayon so I don’t miss it.

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just fill out the order form at http://www.sunfarm.com/orderform.pdf

Allium stellatum
Autumn can be a very dull and boring time in the garden. You miss all the colorful plants that have delighted you spring and summer while you’re busy deadheading or collecting seeds. The memories of the flowers you’ve enjoyed are just that, you’re wishing there were perennials that would bring you color and joy this time of year and well….. your wish has come true. The “Plant Genie” wishes to acquaint you with Allium stellatum. Commonly known as “Autumn Onion”, Allium stellatum is a native, fall blooming perennial that will grow happily anywhere in the US.

Their long lasting, 2″ – 3″ lavender/pink, star like blooms seem to explode like fireworks at the tip of their slender 12″ – 18″ arching stems. They look vital for several weeks and make wonderful cut flowers.

Full sun to light shade is their preference with average to dry soil. Allium stellatum has no insect, pest or disease problems. You needn’t worry about Bambi or any other critters bothering them either.

Allium stellatum produces new bulbs each growing season and you can even grow them from seed, although since it takes several years to get a flowering size bulb from seed, division is the best method to build a colony quickly.

I’ve some nice bareroot plants of Allium stellatum to share with you and shipping is FREE, pricing follows:

7   for $ 35.00  delivered ($5.00 ea)
10  for $ 45.00  delivered ($4.50 ea)
15  for $ 60.00  delivered ($4.00 ea)
20  for $ 70.00  delivered ($3.50 ea)
50  for $150.00  delivered ($3.00 ea)

Larger quantities at even lower prices upon request.

If you have any questions about this plant or any of the other plants that I offer, send an email to my personal email address – barry@sunfarm.com and I’ll reply as quickly as I can. If you’d like a return phone call, please include your phone # and the best time to call.

And, if you don’t have the time or desire to plant them at this point in time, you can still reserve them for a later ship date by specifying that date in a space provided on our order form. Please circle the ship date in red crayonso I don’t miss it.

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just fill out the order form at http://www.sunfarm.com/orderform.pdf

Allium tricoccum "Ramps"
The “Cat Is Out Of The Bag”! The “Word Is On The Street”! Well….. there are a lot of ways to say it, but you get my drift. I’m referring to the same news that I learned over 42 years ago when, as a young, naive lad, I moved to the mountains of Greenbrier County, West Virginia from the streets of Philadelphia. The local folks were enthralled with us, the “Back To The Land,” “Hippie Homesteaders” influx and were very eager to teach us the ways of the wild. They would take us out into the woods to educate us about edible wild plants like “Rock Lettuce” (Saxifraga micranthidfolia), “Creasy Greens” (Barbarea verna), “Poke Salad” (Phytolacca americana), “Shepherds Purse” (Capsella bursa-pastoris), “Purslane” (Portulaca oleracea) and many other edible wild “weeds”. However, the most cherished and prized edible “native” of all was Allium tricoccum or what they introduced us to as “Ramps”. The word Ramps is a corruption of the old Anglic word “Ramson”, in case you’re wondering how this seemingly strange common name originated.

Now, decades later, it seems that every five star, gourmet restaurant in the US has a “Ramp” dish on the menu.

“Ramps” aka Allium tricoccum, are really wild leeks. They combine the taste of garlic (Allium sativum) with the taste of onion (Allium cepa), although that’s really somewhat of an oversimplification as the taste of “Ramps” is bursting with other so many other flavors and nuances that they leave their actual essence difficult to verbalize. Only your culinary imagination will limit their possibilities in your own kitchen. I use the leaves in salads and stir fries, and chop the bulbs for Miso soup and many other dishes.

But besides being delicious, they’re also a highly interesting and desirable landscape plant for the shade garden. They emerge from bare ground in early Spring with very supple medium green foliage and stand about 6″ – 12″ tall. When these leaves disappear, you get 8″ – 12″ sturdy flower stems topped with lovely white flowers. These flowers eventually get pollinated and reveal their very attractive shiny black seeds. “Ramps” are very easy to grow from seed, and the bulbs usually double and form new bulbs that you can pull apart and replant.

Here in WV, “Ramps” are celebrated like saints and holidays. There are many “Ramp Suppers”run by various chambers of commerce and volunteer fire departments etc.

These woodland treasures are becoming so popular that even Martha Stewart put up a page of 15 recipes for cooking with “Ramps”, and here’s another 7 recipesfor you. Would you believe that Arianna Huffington has her own “Ramp” recipes. I even found quick and easy directions for making “Ramp Butter”

And if all that weren’t enough, “Ramps” have a huge store of vitamins and minerals, and like garlic and onions, have many nutritional values and medicinal benefits.

“Ramps” are super easy to grow and have no insect, pest or disease problems. All you need is some shade. Of course, the richer and moister your shade is, the better they’ll grow. Very serious, detailed cultivation information and some less detailed, but very relevant cultivation information can be found at these links.

I guess that after all that exciting information about “Ramps”, you’re saying to yourself, “WOW, where can I buy some of these amazing plants”. Well… you’re just a couple clicks away. YES, you can buy “Ramps” right here. I’ve had “Ramps” for sale for several years now and I’ve sold quite a few, but wanted to build up a large stock before doing a mailing. And now the time is right to plant them for a good seed set next year.

What I’ll be sending you are fully dormant, mature, bareroot, seed grown bulbs. They’ll be wrapped gingerly in long fibered, unmilled, moistened sphagnum moss. I’ll include a free plant with seedheads forming on it with each order so you can get a head start on raising your own “Mess O Ramps” from seed this year.

The pricing below includes FREE SHIPPING via Insured Priority Mail.

10  for $ 49.50 delivered ($4.95 ea)
25  for $ 98.75 delivered ($3.95 ea)
50  for $162.50 delivered ($3.25 ea)
75  for $221.25 delivered ($2.95 ea)
100 for $250.00 delivered ($2.50 ea)

 

Larger quantities at even lower prices upon request.

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just fill out the order form at http://www.sunfarm.com/orderform.pdf or download and print our order form and send it along with your check to:

Internet Order Department
Sunshine Farm & Gardens
HC 67 Box 539 B
Renick WV 24966 USA

Allium tuberosum
Late Summer, early Autumn is a time of year when there isn’t much of anything going on in most gardens, so permit me to introduce you to one of my favorite “Shade Brighteners”, Allium tuberosum. I’ve been growing this reliable plant for over 20 years now and that period of time encompasses many droughts and several bitter, well below zero, no snow cover Winters. The 12″ – 24″ tall, erect stems have never failed to yield a bounty of large, round, snow white flower heads that last for weeks. I have it growing in full sun, as well as in full shade and it doesn’t seem to have any preferences as far as light or soil type goes.

The “Tiger Swallowtail” Butterfly, Papilio glaucus, enjoys it as a source of nectar, as do many other butterfly species. Allium tuberosum is native to Southeastern Asia where it is used medicinally for urinary incontinence, kidney and bladder weakness and stomach chills. Also, it is used as a poultice for knee injuries. In traditional Chinese medicine, a powder is made from the seeds and is known as Jiu Cai Zi and, according to a multitude of sources, has many health benefits. The common name for Allium tuberosum is “Garlic Chives” and I use it as a substitute for Allium schoenoprasum, the species commercially grown for Chives. It’s a close relative of Allium cepa, the Onion and Allium sativum, Garlic.

[]According to most authorities, Allium tuberosum has a hardiness range of USDA zones 3 – 10 and that means that it will grow in any state in the US. The ever-enlarging clumps, like the one pictured in my garden below, can produce over 50 flowering stems in just a few years. Clumps can easily be divided and it’s a no brainer to grow from the copious seed crop that you’ll be able to harvest when the flowers fade. The flowers are also easy to dry and use in dry flower arrangements.

The Kemper Center at the Missouri Botanic Garden has some great images and further info on Allium tuberosum.

I have a good stock of flowering age plants in 2″ pots that are 2 years old and ready to flower. I’ve saved some for your garden and you can order them at the prices below.

The prices shown below include FREE SHIPPING on bareroot plants out of their 2″ pots. If you would like to receive the plants undisturbed, in their pots, please add .95� per plant to cover the extra cost of shipping soil and pots.

7   for $ 35.00  delivered ($5.00 ea)
10  for $ 45.00  delivered ($4.50 ea)
15  for $ 60.00  delivered ($4.00 ea)
20  for $ 70.00  delivered ($3.50 ea)
50  for $150.00  delivered ($3.00 ea)

 

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just download and print our order form and send it along with your check to:

Internet Order Department
Sunshine Farm & Gardens
HC 67 Box 539 B
Renick WV 24966 USA

Allium senescens subsp. Glaucum
One of my faves, and for a multitude of reasons, is Allium senescens subsp. Glaucum. This clump forming Asian/European native perennial bulb is lovely from head to toe. Known also by the common name of “German Garlic”, this especially attractive form of the species sports very subtle, bluish, linear foliage all Spring, Summer & Autumn. It forms a very tight, compact plant that looks great at the front of a sunny or shady border, or anywhere in a rock garden. In mid to late Summer and early Autumn, a multitude of tight buds on rigid 6″ stems explode like fireworks with lilac/lavender flowers that seem to last for weeks and weeks. These delightful blooms are especially welcome at a time of the year that there seems to be a dearth of color and excitement in the garden.

As with other species and cultivars in the family, Allium senescens subsp. Glaucum is 100 percent varmint proof and hardy into USDA Zone 4, perhaps 3 as its native range takes it all the way from Central China to Korea and into Northern Siberia.

Welcome companion plants are Hosta, Tricyrtis, sedges – well, just use your imagination. It looks great under taller plants, especially ones that lose their lower leaves as the summer progresses as it will hide their bare stems.

This very drought tolerant plant will grow happily in just about any type of soil from average to dry. The only places it won’t grow well are wet or soggy areas. Copious new bulbs are produced as the plant matures and it makes a wonderful pass along plant to share with your friends, even those who don’t garden. Just tell them GSU (Green Side Up) or in this case BSU (Blue Side Up).

You can have single, bareroot plants of Allium senescens subsp.’Glaucum’ in full flower at the prices listed below with FREE SHIPPING:

7  for $ 35.00  delivered ($5.00 ea)
10  for $ 45.00  delivered ($4.50 ea)
15  for $ 60.00  delivered ($4.00 ea)
20  for $ 70.00  delivered ($3.50 ea)
50  for $150.00  delivered ($3.00 ea)

And here’s the really good news….. I just about always offer FREE SHIPPING on bareroot plants, but if you add an additional .95 cents per plant, you can not only have them delivered to your doorstep via Priority Mail in the 2″ pots I grow them in, but each pot will have at least 2 plants in it.

If you are away from home or for some reason not ready to plant them now, you can still reserve them for a later ship date by specifying that date in a space provided on our order form. Please circle the ship date in red crayon so I don’t miss it.

Larger quantities are available at even lower prices upon request.

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just fill out the order form at http://www.sunfarm.com/orderform.pdf

Alstromeria psittacina
WOW!!! A hardy Alstroemeria??? Yes a hardy Alstroemeria!!! A native of Northern Brazil, Alstroemeria psittacina is a GREAT cut flower growing here in my zone 5 garden for over 10 years now.

The luscious, supple foliage makes a great groundcover, and in mid Summer, the reddish green flowers rise up 12″-24″ over the foliage. Because the flowers shoot out at different angles, it is difficult to photograph, so please keep this in mind as you view the enclosed photo. Propagation is very easy from division, and being a species, it comes true from seed.

I am getting ready to trial out another species that I’ve been growing from seed and understand to be hardy also to zone 5, Alstroemeria aurantica. It has a really different, deep, yellowish-orange color with dark black veining, stay tuned!

Linnaeus named this genus in honor of his buddy and pupil, Baron Clas Alstroemer (1736-1794), a Swedish naturalist.

Alstroemeria has long been a cut flower on the tables of many a fine restaurant. Most of the hybrid Alstroemerias that are sold in this country are imported by air freight from South America.

Dr. Mark Bridgen at the University of Connecticut has been doing some real serious breeding work in the genus Alstroemeria, rather than clog up your mailbox with a bunch of attachments, I have set up a link for Mark to get on his soapbox and tell you all about his work. There are 4 jpegs and the text file is his story in his own words.http://www.sunfarm.com/images/Alstroemeria His introductions are not only bold and beautiful, but hardy. Marks email address is bridgen@uconn.edu

Just the facts M’am:
Kingdom – 
Plantae
Phylum – Anthophytae
Class – Monocotolydonae
Subclass – Liliidae
Order – Liliales
Family – Alstroemeriaceae
Genus – Alstroemeria
Species – psittacina
Common name – “Spider Lily”
Synonyms – Alstroemeria pulchella
Native of – Brazil
USDA Hardiness Zone – zone 5, maybe 4?
Light preference – Full sun to full shade
Soil preference – Average
Moisture preference – Average to moist
Bloom time – Mid Summer
Bloom color – White
Foliage – Medium to light green
Spread – slow to medium groundcover
Height – 12″ – 24″
Landscape uses – Mid border
Medicinal uses – None that I have found

Arisaema triphyllum

You remember “Jack” from those walks in the woods with your grandfather, those really intriguing, curious flowers that nobody seemed to understand. Arisaema triphyllum, aka “Jack in the Pulpit” is one of the most mystical native plants that I’ve ever grown. There’s nothing like a colony of these guys in the shade garden to stimulate conversation, considering their large Philodendron like leaves (They’re in the same family – Araceae), the magical flowers and the dark red seed heads that form in early to mid-Autumn. Not many other plants give you so many seasons of interest. I’ve seen them grow as tall as 48″ at maturity and they just keep getting bigger and more robust every year.

Arisaema triphyllum is quite easy to grow and prefers rich, moisture retentive soil in light to full shade. Self seeding occurs, and before you know it, you have a little forest of them. They’re hardy for sure to Zone 5, probably 4, maybe even 3.

The bulbs I’m offering you here are small (8-12 mm in diameter). They’re 3 years old and should flower next year. If your ground is still frozen, no problem, they’re just breaking dormancy and you can probably get a dozen or more into a 6″ pot. Place them on a windowsill and let them sprout out, keeping them moist, but not wet. As soon as it warms up a bit, set them out.

The prices shown below include FREE SHIPPING on bareroot plants out of their 2″ pots. If you would like to receive the plants undisturbed, in their pots, please add .95 per plant to cover the extra cost of shipping soil and pots.

So here’s your chance to have your very own colony of “Jacks”, prices are as follows:

12 are $25.00 delivered ($2.09 ea)
30 are $50.00 delivered ($1.67 ea)
50 are $75.00 delivered ($1.50 ea)
100 are $100.00 delivered ($1.00 ea)

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just download and print our order form and send it along with your check to:

Internet Order Department
Sunshine Farm & Gardens 
HC 67 Box 539 B
Renick WV 24966 USA

Aster divaricatus

Snowstorm in September — that’s what your shade garden will look like when you plant a drift of the very easy to grow, reliable native woodland Aster, Aster divaricatus. The glistening, pure white snowflake shaped flowers have bright yellow centers that fade to a deep rich burgundy as they slowly age over their long, long bloom period during late August through mid October. Here’s one of my very favorite plants for interest at a time of year when there isn’t much happening in the garden.

The height of this plant is just perfect also, 12″ – 24″, about the same as its width. They’re not too tall as the asters that you’d have to tilt you head up to look at and not too diminutive as the ones that you’d find yourself down on your hands and knees to appreciate.

Aster divaricatus is native to almost every state east of the Mississippi and to several provinces of Canada –http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=EUDI16 but will grow well in just about any zone 3 -10 climate. Don’t be alarmed if you see this plant referred to as Eurybia divaricata as this seems to be a taxonomic name change that everyone, myself included, appears to be ignoring.

Butterflies enjoy the flowers just as well as we humans, but the deer don’t bother with it. Although it grows naturally in average soil moisture conditions, it seems to tolerate drought and even excess soil moisture as well.

Aster divaricatus even lends itself perfectly to being used as a long lasting cut flower.

Aster divaricatus can be planted any time that your ground isn’t frozen.

I’ve been building a good stock of plants to share with you and now is a good time to plant them.

What you’ll receive are large, 3 year old bareroot plants. They’ll arrive wrapped in long fibered, unmilled sphagnum moss. This material is antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral and a very useful material.

The prices shown below include FREE SHIPPING on bareroot plants out of their 2″ pots. If you would like to receive the plants undisturbed, in their pots, please add .95¢ per plant to cover the extra cost of shipping soil and pots.

7   for $ 35.00  delivered ($5.00 ea)
10  for $ 45.00  delivered ($4.50 ea)
15  for $ 60.00  delivered ($4.00 ea)
20  for $ 70.00  delivered ($3.50 ea)
50  for $150.00  delivered ($3.00 ea)

Larger quantities at even lower prices upon request.

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just fill out the order form at http://www.sunfarm.com/orderform.pdf

Bergenia ciliata

A hardy African violet on steroids??? Not quite, but when I’m waltzing visitors around the gardens here, I always pose the same question, “Would you like to see a hardy African Violet on steroids?” 

They invariably bite as we hurriedly stroll over to a shade bed under a 60 foot tall Betula pendula and I gleamingly point to a particular drift of ground hugging plants. Their jaws drop. The comments usually range from “I had no idea that there was a hardy African Violet” to “I’ve never imagined an African Violet with foliage that huge.” Inevitably, they ask if I have any for sale – no matter what it is. 

What the hell is this plant… you’re probably asking yourself about now. It’s Bergenia ciliata, an extremely hardy, early flowering, shade loving, sun tolerant, perennial member of the Saxifrage family. It’s native to some very high peaks of the Himalayas, so you know it’s going to be hardy just about anywhere. This welcome addition to any flower garden also happens to be very heat tolerant as I’ve kept several pots of it in a greenhouse that hits triple digits in the Summer heat and the foliage was as firm as if I’d watered them with Viagra.


THANKS to my friend Todd Boland at the Memorial University of Newfoundland Botanical Garden for the use of his excellent images of Bergenia ciliata in flower. His were so much better than mine and I didn’t want to wait till next Spring to share this plant with you.

My image to the right is a 2 year old plant in a gallon pot. I’ve even experienced leaves LARGER than this in the ground.

If you like clouds of pink and white flowers in very early Spring and huge, dramatic, deerproof, rabbittproof, comment enticing, African Violet like foliage the rest of the gardening season, then this plant belongs in your garden. I’ve just about 1000 of my 2″ pots to share with you. Pricing follows for plants shipped in their pots.

I usually offer larger quantities at lower prices here, but in order to insure that no one misses out, I’ve limited the quantity to 7 plants per person.

The prices shown below include FREE SHIPPING!

3   for $ 25.00
7   for $ 50.00 

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just fill out the order form at http://www.sunfarm.com/orderform.pdf or download and print our order form and send it along with your check to:

Internet Order Department
Sunshine Farm & Gardens
HC 67 Box 539 B
Renick WV 24966 US

Camassia scilloides

Exceptionally rare!

But……… exceptionally easy to grow, and exceptionally rewarding.

Camassia scilloides may just be one of the very rarest plants that I’ve ever grown, but it’s also one of the easiest. Native to almost every state east of the Rocky Mountains, I can’t imagine a climate where it wouldn’t thrive in an average to well drained, shady to dappled sunlight spot in the garden.

I know you’ll be enthralled in early Spring when a medium green bud pokes its head up from the bare ground. For me, here in zone 5, that’s late March. In less than a couple of weeks, that tip pushes skyward and unfurls into glossy, strapping foliage that is 12″ – 24″ long and 1″ wide. A short time later, a sturdy spike, loaded with flower buds starts edging up slowly. And then, all of a sudden, dozens of soft, greyish blue, six petaled, starlike flowers begin opening from the bottom up.

The flowers remain open for quite a while and clean up very nicely. I’ve even used them as cut flowers and they hold up very well. If you’re lucky, they’ll set seeds without any help from you, but if you want to assure yourself a good seed set, get out there with a small paint brush and play Bumble Bee and dab some pollen from the open anthers on to the stigma in the center of the flower. Even the seed pods are ornamental. You can let them self sow or collect the seeds and sow them in pots. The bulbs they grow from are very perennial and I’ve had mine for many years. They’ve also self sown into a lovely colony.

Camassia scilloides seems to have no insect, pest or disease problems and although I can’t steadfastly say that this plant is 100% varmint proof, it’s not the first choice of any of the hungry critters that make my farm their home. I’ve rarely seen it disturbed.

Over the last few years, I’ve been building a good stock of this beautiful plant to share with you, and if now isn’t the correct time to plant in your area, you can still reserve them for a later ship date by specifying that in a space provided on our order form. Please circle the ship date in red so I don’t miss it.

What you’ll receive are bareroot, flowering size 5 to 7 year old bulbs, wrapped in long fibered, unmilled sphagnum moss. This material is antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral and a very useful material.

The prices shown below include FREE SHIPPING on bareroot plants out of their 2″ pots. If you would like to receive the plants undisturbed, in their pots, please add .95¢ per plant to cover the extra cost of shipping soil and pots.

3   for $ 25.00  delivered ($8.35 ea)
7   for $ 50.00  delivered ($7.15 ea)
12  for $ 75.00  delivered ($6.25 ea)
20  for $100.00  delivered ($5.00 ea)

Larger quantities at even lower prices upon request.

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just fill out the order form at http://www.sunfarm.com/orderform.pdf

Carex laxiculmis
I’m sooooo very tired of seeing acres of that ubiquitous Liriope used by landscape architects with no imagination at all. While I’ll admit that there are a few attractive, variegated forms of this Asian native that have come to be known commonly as “Lily Turf”, their hardiness is questionable and they don’t do very well in the shade.

Like an answer to a prayer, in comes our native sedge, Carex laxiculmis!

Carex laxiculmis is native to almost every state east of the Mississippi and most of eastern Canada. You’ve probably walked over or around it on a hike in the woods and didn’t notice it there amongst the rocks and tree roots.

The image I’ve chosen to share with you today is not a beautifully groomed, suburban landscape job. Rather, it is an illustration of, and tribute to, the extreme conditions that this useful plant can withstand. Talk about “Low Maintenance”, this plant is “NO Maintenance”!! The location is thin soil in deep shade on a south facing hillside on my farm. These nearly barren, dry woods have had no significant rainfall or watering for over 8 weeks and the plants still look good.

Given a lawn or garden setting, Carex laxiculmis is quick to fill in a bare area and can take bright sun with a bit of occasional watering and a good mulch, or light to deep shade with no attention at all. It’s very easy to divide and make new plants.

Soooo many folks come to me looking for grass-like plants to grow in the shade. It seems that we haven’t gotten over the love of lawns that we’ve grown up with, even though we can all admit to their being ecologically detrimental to the environment.

Since this evergreen plant is so low growing, it NEVER needs mowing and NEVER takes on an unsightly appearance at any time of the year.

I’m confident that you’ll find multiple uses for this great plant in your home gardens and landscape and I look forward to sharing it with you and to hearing back from you about your experiences with it.

I’ve a good bit of some most generous, bareroot divisions of Carex laxiculmis to share with you and shipping is FREE, pricing follows:

7  for $ 35.00  delivered ($5.00 ea)
10  for $ 45.00  delivered ($4.50 ea)
15  for $ 60.00  delivered ($4.00 ea)
20  for $ 70.00  delivered ($3.50 ea)
50  for $150.00  delivered ($3.00 ea)

Larger quantities at even lower prices upon request.

If you have any questions about this plant or any of the other plants that I offer, send an email to my personal email address – barry@sunfarm.com and I’ll reply as quickly as I can. If you’d like a return phone call, please include your phone # and the best time to call.

And, if you don’t have the time or desire to plant them at this point in time, you can still reserve them for a later ship date by specifying that date in a space provided on our order form. Please circle the ship date in red crayon so I don’t miss it.

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just fill out the order form at http://www.sunfarm.com/orderform.pdf

Claytonia sibirica
The commonly spoken name for plants in the genus Claytonia is “Spring Beauty”, and with good reason. The species in this genus are know for their early Spring flowers and also for a very brief display and an ephemeral nature. Then along comes Claytonia sibirica, the Russian cousin to our native Claytonia virginica and Claytonia caroliniana. Not only is Claytonia sibirica a long bloomer in the Spring, but it blooms off and on all Summer and Autumn. The foliage stays with us the gardening season long. An easy to grow perennial for the shade garden, it also seeds itself into a dramatic colony in just a year or two. The foliage is thick, supple and seems almost succulent. Five white notched petals on each flower are tinged with a pinkish lavender striping that emanates a soft glow for weeks.

My original specimen came from the garden of Carl Hanscomb in Occidental, California and was growing quite happily in full California sun, so I believe that it will grow in just about any locale in the US. Height is about 4″ to 6″ tall and they form a nice tight clump about 8″ – 12″ in diameter after the second year of growth.

By the way, the genus Claytonia is in the Portulacaceae family and is named in honor of John Clayton (1693-1773) one of the earliest American botanists who lived in Gloucester, Virginia. Clayton collected specimens for “Flora Virginica”, one of the first books on American botany. (Just thought you might like to know)

For an eye-poppin’ screen-fillin’ image of Claytonia sibirica, hop on over to http://sunfarm.com/images/claysiblg.jpg

I’ve been sharing my limited stock of Claytonia sibirica in 2″ treeband ® pots for $7.50 ea plus shipping. Over the last few years, I’ve really put some effort into building a large quantity so as to be able to reduce the price and I’m pleased to tell you that I’ve succeeded. The prices shown below include FREE SHIPPING on bareroot plants out of their 2″ pots. If you would like to receive the plants undisturbed, in their pots, please add .95¢ per plant to cover the extra cost of shipping soil and pots.

7 for $ 35.00 ($5.00 ea)
10 for $ 45.00 ($4.50 ea)
15 for $ 60.00 ($4.00 ea)
20 for $ 70.00 ($3.50 ea)
50 for $150.00 ($3.00 ea)

 

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just download and print our order form and send it along with your check to:

Internet Order Department
Sunshine Farm & Gardens
HC 67 Box 539 B
Renick WV 24966 USA

Claytonia virginica
I’ve really never been a big fan of “Common Names” for plants, but every once in a while, one really hits the nail on the head and “Spring Beauty” is a resoundingly perfect tribute to Claytonia virginica, the earliest of the early, ephemeral Spring wildflowers. Claytonia virginica is native to over half of the US and to several provinces in Canada – http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=CLVI3 It’s one of our most beloved harbingers of Spring with its dark green, supple, almost succulent foliage and five petaled white flowers with soft pink veining.

Claytonia virginica grows from a small, round perennial tuber and sets a good bit of seed so a colony will appear before you know it. I find it useful as an early groundcover due to its diminutive height of 3″ – 8″.  It’s really very easy to grow in sun or shade and looks lovely in the front of a perennial border or along a path in the woods. I’ve even seen it naturalized in people’s lawns and it’s also 100% deerproof which is a great plus these days.

The genus name is in honor of John Clayton (1694–1773) who was a colonial plant collector in Virginia. He was born in England and moved to Virginia with his father in 1715, where he lived in Gloucester County, exploring the region botanically. Clayton sent many specimens, as well as manuscript descriptions, to Dutch botanist Jan Frederik Gronovius in the 1730’s. Without Clayton’s knowledge, Gronovius used the material in his Flora Virginica (1739–1743, 2nd ed. 1762). Many of Clayton’s specimens were also studied by the European botanists Carl Linnaeus and George Clifford and it was Linnaeus that gave the genus the name Claytonia.

A very similar native species is Claytonia caroliniana  The two species are similar in habit and flower, the only difference being the foliage.

Claytonia sibirica is another species of “Spring Beauty” that is less ephemeral, but not as perennial.

The genus Claytonia is a member of the Portulacaceae family which is also home to the very popular annual Portulaca grandiflora

I’ve been building a good stock of Claytonia virginica to share with you and if your ground is frozen, not to worry, as you can specify the shipdate for your particular area in a provided space on our online PDF orderform.

What you’ll receive are large, 5 year old bareroot blooming size tubers. They’ll arrive wrapped in long fibered, unmilled sphagnum moss. This material is antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral and a very useful material.

The prices shown below include FREE SHIPPING on bareroot plants out of their 2″ pots. If you would like to receive the plants undisturbed, in their pots, please add .95¢ per plant to cover the extra cost of shipping soil and pots.

7   for $ 35.00  delivered ($5.00 ea)
10  for $ 45.00  delivered ($4.50 ea)
15  for $ 60.00  delivered ($4.00 ea)
20  for $ 70.00  delivered ($3.50 ea)
50  for $150.00  delivered ($3.00 ea)

Larger quantities at even lower prices upon request.

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just fill out the order form athttp://www.sunfarm.com/orderform.pdf

Most of our previous weekly specials are still available. Go to –http://sunfarm.com/specials/ to browse the archives.

Clintonia umbellulata
 

Even if Clintonia umbellulata didn’t have pure white globular umbels of long lasting flowers with the cutest little green dots at the tip of each petal, the lush, thick, supple, tropical looking, orchid like foliage would be enough to satisfy the desires of even the most demanding of gardeners.

Again, as with most of the plants that I’ve been showcasing for you this Spring, Clintonia umbellulata seems to be hardy in just about every state of the US and province of Canada.

Clintonia umbellulata is definitely a plant that you should be seeing more of in cultivation, and I’m on a mission to make that a reality. It’s a very easy perennial to grow in average to moist shade and the deer don’t seem to pay any attention to it, but you and any visitors to your garden sure will. For a couple of weeks in mid Spring, the white flowers light up the shade like a beacon. Clintonia umbellulata is about 6″ – 12″ tall and her flower stems tower about 6″ – 10″ above the foliage. Full shade to dappled sunlight in rich to average soil is her preference, but she really isn’t too fussy.

Clintonia umbellulata is native to ten Mid-Atlantic and Southern states .

[]By the way, Clintonia umbellulata has a couple of cousins. There is a West Coast species, Clintonia uniflora – and a somewhat northern species Clintonia borealis – both of which I am hell bent on getting into cultivation, so stay tuned.

I have limited supply of Clintonia umbellulata to share with you.

What you’ll receive are bareroot, flowering size, 3 to 5 year old plants, wrapped in long fibered, unmilled sphagnum moss. This material is antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral and a very useful material. I also have a good stock of Clintonia umbellulata in 2″ deep pots and if you would rather have them arrive in pots, add $1.95 per plant to cover the extra cost of shipping. My stock plants are in 5″ deep pots and I could be persuaded to part with a few of them, so if you are interested, just send an email to my personal email address – barry@sunfarm.com with your phone #  and I’ll call you.

The prices shown below include FREE SHIPPING on bareroot plants.

3   for $ 25.00  delivered ($8.35 ea)
7   for $ 50.00  delivered ($7.15 ea)

I usually offer larger quantities of featured plants at even lower prices, but due to the rarity and scarcity of Clintonia umbellulata, I must limit each gardener to 7 plants.

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just fill out the order form at http://www.sunfarm.com/orderform.pdf

 

 

Crocosmia 'Elizabethan Gardens'
“Mountain Man” that I am, I’ve never been a big fan of the beach, so when my kids were little and we took them to romp in the sea, I’d wander about looking for something to do. Now, West Virginia, a land-locked state, is about 8 hours from the closest beach, the Outer Banks of NC. On one of my travels, I stumbled upon The Elizabethan Gardens in Manteo, NC. These gardens were born in the early 1950’s as a memorial to the first English colonists who came to North America in 1584-1587 with visions of colonizing the new world under Queen Elizabeth I. The garden volunteers were so friendly and the gardens so delightful that they soon became a regular pilgrimage for me.

It was on one of those visits that I discovered a charming plant with the most inviting, warmest, unique flowers and graceful arching habit. I queried all the staff and volunteers as to the identity of the plant and was quite surprised that no one had any idea as to the name of the plant or its origins. However, they all commented on how much they treasured it and used it for cut flower arrangements and to how well behaved the plant was. They generously offered me a division and I went merrily on my way. I planted their gift in a shady spot in my garden where it has been happily and reliably flowering for the last 20 + years.

I’ve since identified the plant as a Crocosmia and have shared it with several other folks. It seems that it is a unique, unnamed selection so I have bestowed upon it the name Crocosmia ‘Elizabethan Gardens’ in honor of its homeplace. Crocosmia ‘Elizabethan Gardens’ seems equally happy in sun or shade and in average soil.

Crocosmia is a small genus of perennial species in Iridaceae, the Iris family. They’re primarily native to grasslands of the Cape Floristic Region of South Africa. The name Crocosmia is derived from the Greek words krokos (saffron) and osme (smell), referring to the saffron-like scent when dried flowers are dipped in water.

This particular Crocosmia has been perfectly hardy down to -12 degrees Fahrenheit with no snow cover. It seems to be sterile and has never set seeds, so there is no problem with aggressive seeding around. It’s a clump forming plant and doesn’t run all over the place. The deer and other varmints have never touched it and this Crocosmia makes an unusual, colorful and long lasting cut flower. Many new corms are set each year so it’s a nice pass-along plant to share with friends. Sounds almost too good to be true, doesn’t it? No bad habits!

I’ve been building a good stock of Crocosmia ‘Elizabethan Gardens’ to share with you.

What you’ll receive are large, 5 year old bareroot blooming size corms in full active growth. They’ll arrive wrapped in long fibered, unmilled sphagnum moss. This material is antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral and a very useful material.

The prices shown below include FREE SHIPPING on bareroot plants out of their 2″ pots. If you would like to receive the plants undisturbed, in their pots, please add .95¢ per plant to cover the extra cost of shipping soil and pots.

7   for $ 35.00  delivered ($5.00 ea)
10  for $ 45.00  delivered ($4.50 ea)
15  for $ 60.00  delivered ($4.00 ea)
20  for $ 70.00  delivered ($3.50 ea)
50  for $150.00  delivered ($3.00 ea)

Larger quantities at even lower prices upon request.

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just fill out the order form at http://www.sunfarm.com/orderform.pdf

Dentaria laciniata
That’s only two of the complimentary adjectives that spontaneously pop into my mind and best describe our beloved, native Dentaria laciniata, one of the earliest plants to flower in the Spring.

Known to legions of wildflower lovers worldwide as “Cutleaf Toothwort”, the bloom can be so prolific that the ground seems carpeted by snowfall when the long lasting white flowers open.

But exquisite flowers alone shouldn’t be your only motive for growing the ever perennial Dentaria laciniata, as the fabulous, finely filigreed, fancy, free-flowing, fantastic foliage is variably delightful and the 6″-12″ tall plants are a welcome addition to any garden. I’ve had equal success growing them in full sun and full shade. Actually, there isn’t much shade this time of year except for the shadows of large tree trunks. Dentaria laciniata is not very particular of soil type, texture or fertility. In the wild, I’ve seen it growing in a host of situations, all except for wet, soggy conditions.

Despite the delicate looking foliage and dainty flowers, Dentaria laciniata is one helluva tough plant! This past Winter, temps plummeted to minus 12 degrees Fahrenheit with 45 mile per hour arctic blasts and all of my Dentaria laciniata was outside unprotected by their usual blanket of snow. They survived beautifully and are now ready for a new home in YOUR garden.

The common name of the genus is  “Toothwort”. It acquired this moniker and the scientific name, Dentaria (which means teeth in Latin) because of the irregular angular ribs, or “teeth”, which are actually leaf scars from the previous season’s growth. This effect is more apparent on the related species Dentaria diphylla as Dentaria laciniata grows from a more tuberlike rootstock. As for the other common name of the genus Dentaria, “Pepper Root”, it’s said that Native Americans enjoyed the peppery taste of the root. They also used the root medicinally although I haven’t been able to find the exact medicinal attributes.

This is an extremely effortless plant to grow and before you know it, you’ll have a great colony of bright white flowers in early Spring. Propagation is easy by seed. By the way, the brown seed pods are called silique and contain dark brown seeds that mature about 4-5 weeks after flowering. The seeds can be collected and sown in pots or you can just let Mother Nature do her thing.

I’ve been building a good stock of Dentaria laciniata and Dentaria diphylla to share with you.

What you’ll receive are 5 year old bareroot, blooming size plants. They’ll arrive on your doorstep wrapped in long fibered, unmilled sphagnum moss. This material is antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral and a very useful material.

And………..as incentive for you to try both species of Dentaria in your garden, you can take an extra 10% discount when you buy ANY quantity of both. There’s a place on the order form for you to subtract your discount.

The prices shown below include FREE SHIPPING on bareroot plants out of their 2″ pots. If you would like to receive the plants undisturbed, in their pots, please add .95¢ per plant to cover the extra cost of shipping soil and pots.

7   for $ 35.00  delivered ($5.00 ea)
10  for $ 45.00  delivered ($4.50 ea)
15  for $ 60.00  delivered ($4.00 ea)
20  for $ 70.00  delivered ($3.50 ea)
50  for $150.00  delivered ($3.00 ea)

Larger quantities at even lower prices upon request.

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just fill out the order form.

Digitalis lutea
“Foxgloves” are a wonderful bunch of plants for brilliant color in the garden. The problem is, most of them are biennials or very short lived perennials at best. Here’s a “Foxglove” that’s not only perennial, but self sows itself into a colossal colony of continual color. I’ve been growing Digitalis lutea for many years now and it’s never disappointed me. The long lasting, bright yellow blooms open from the bottom up over a long period of time in early Summer and make great cut flowers. Almost overnight, from a rosette of soft, velvety leaves, multiple 12″ – 24″ stems arise with dark green foliage and dozens of flower buds.

Digitalis lutea seems to be equally happy in full sun or full shade, although they tend to be a bit sturdier with more sun.

Not only that, but they’re really tough plants! They’ve survived in pots to 9 degrees with no snow cover, in pots!!! And………the deer, rabbits, chipmunks etc don’t pay any attention to them.

There’s some very interesting information about the genus Digitalis on Wikipedia – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digitalis and I have several other species that I’m growing and will have available to share with you soon.

 

In the meantime, I have a nice stash of Digitalis lutea to share with you now. What you’ll receive are bareroot, flowering size 3 year old plants out of 2″ pots, with their roots wrapped in long fibered, unmilled sphagnum moss. This material is antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral and a very useful material to recycle. If you’d rather have them arrive in their pots, please add $1.95 per plant to cover the extra cost of shipping.

The prices shown below include FREE SHIPPING on bareroot plants out of their 2″ pots. If you would like to receive the plants undisturbed, in their pots, please add .95¢ per plant to cover the extra cost of shipping soil and pots.

7   for $ 35.00  delivered ($5.00 ea)
10  for $ 45.00  delivered ($4.50 ea)
15  for $ 60.00  delivered ($4.00 ea)
20  for $ 70.00  delivered ($3.50 ea)
50  for $150.00  delivered ($3.00 ea)

Larger quantities at even lower prices upon request.

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just fill out the order form at http://www.sunfarm.com/orderform.pdf

 

 

Diphylleia cymosa
Diphylleia cymosa is one of the most striking plants I’ve ever grown. Native to 5 southeastern states it seems to be hardy in all 50. The common name of “American Umbrella Leaf” is quite apropos as her beautifully scalloped leaves can grow up to 24″ and provide a dry spot for all the little critters that seek refuge in your garden during a rainstorm, hence the umbrella reference. A friend refers to Diphylleia cymosa as a “May Apple on steroids” and that’s an interesting comparison as the both plants are members of the same family, Berberidaceae. The comparison stops here as Diphylleia cymosa has clusters of white flowers that age into dark berries while Podophyllum peltatum, “May Apple”, has a solitary flower hidden under its much smaller, less scalloped leaves.

Diphylleia cymosa does well in the shade in average garden soil, but give it a little extra moisture and a good mulch to hold the moisture in – then stand back as heights of over 48″ are not uncommon.

Deer and other varmints don’t seem very interested in Diphylleia cymosa, although I’ve had the flowers nipped at once or twice in the last two decades. You can divide the rhizome every few years to get more plants, or even easier than that, collect the berries in the Autumn, wash the pulp off, sow them and they’ll germinate the following Spring. Your seedlings will mature into flowering size plants in 3-5 years.


All in all, the only way to kill them is to plant them in full, direct sun in dusty, dry soil, but you wouldn’t want to do that anyway, would you?

A colony of Diphylleia cymosa is a very dramatic sight and will garner interest from anyone who sees them whether they are a serious plant person or not.

I’ve built quite a good stock of these robust plants over the last several years and it would be my pleasure to share some with you.

 

What you’ll receive are bareroot, flowering size 5 to 7 year old plants, wrapped in long fibered, unmilled sphagnum moss. This material is antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral and a very useful material. I also have a good stock of Diphylleia cymosa in 5″ deep pots and if you would rather have them arrive in pots, add $1.95 per plant to cover the extra cost of shipping.

The prices shown below include FREE SHIPPING on bareroot plants out of their 2″ pots. If you would like to receive the plants undisturbed, in their pots, please add .95¢ per plant to cover the extra cost of shipping soil and pots.

3   for $ 25.00  delivered ($8.35 ea)
7   for $ 50.00  delivered ($7.15 ea)
12  for $ 75.00  delivered ($6.25 ea)
20  for $100.00  delivered ($5.00 ea)

Larger quantities at even lower prices upon request.

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just fill out the order form at http://www.sunfarm.com/orderform.pdf

 

 

 

Disporopsis Pernyi
I LOVE the graceful arching stems of Disporopsis pernyi even when they’re not in flower. The waxy, supple, glossy foliage they sport is almost succulent in appearance.

Some folks errantly refer to this genus as a “Solomons Seal”, but if you look at the word Disporopsis and break it down in botanical nomenclature, the suffix “Opsis”, from the Greek word for appearance, means “similar to”, or “resembling”. Consequently, I would take that to mean when the plant was named, it was thought to resemble Disporum, not Polygonatum (the genus of “Solomons Seal”). Maybe we should christen a new genus Polygonopsis?? If anything, Disporopsis pernyi closely resembles our lovely, native Streptopus roseus.

Whatever the name is, means or doesn’t mean, you’re looking at a plant that fills in a shady space in the garden quite quickly without taking over. I’ve been growing Disporopsis pernyi in my brutal Zone: 5 garden for many years now and in some milder Winters, it even remains evergreen for me. In Zone: 6 and warmer gardens, it should be reliably evergreen.

Plants average about 12″ to 18″ tall and can take full shade, although a bit of dappled sunlight will encourage a larger colony faster. Average soil moisture and texture is all that’s required for a healthy plant. All in all, it’s another of what I call, “Idiotproof” plants. You can even collect seed to produce more plants, although this is a very generous plant in providing new divisions.

The early to mid Spring, delicate, pendulous, white flowers followed by the black berries that Disporopsis pernyi produces are the perfect companion to Hosta, Tricyrtis, Polygonatum, well……. just about anything really. It’s a very easy plant for other plants to get along with.

Although not one of their first meal choices, Disporopsis pernyi isn’t 100 percent deerproof, but as I always tell you, this is one of those plants that’s worth a little effort to protect from Bambi’s reach, be it with a fence or a deer repellent.

You’ll find this super plant in a few of the “gourmet” plant catalogs for considerably more money than my offer below.

I’ve a good bit of some most generous, bareroot divisions of Disporopsis pernyi to share with you and shipping is FREE, pricing follows:

7   for $ 35.00  delivered ($5.00 ea)
10  for $ 45.00  delivered ($4.50 ea)
15  for $ 60.00  delivered ($4.00 ea)
20  for $ 70.00  delivered ($3.50 ea)
50  for $150.00  delivered ($3.00 ea)

Larger quantities at even lower prices upon request.

And if now isn’t the correct time to plant in your area, you can still reserve them for a later ship date by specifying that in a space provided on our order form. Please circle the ship date in red crayon so I don’t miss it.

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just fill out the order form at http://www.sunfarm.com/orderform.pdf

Dodecatheon meadia
Meteoric!! Well, maybe that’s a bit of a stretch, but “Shooting Stars” is the common name for Dodecatheon meadia and you really don’t have to stretch your imagination too far to see how folks arrived at that monikerHere’s a very unusual, easy to grow early Spring ephemeral wildflower that’s native to 27 states east of the Mississippi, yet will find itself happy and at home just about anywhere.

Dodecatheon meadia is a member of the Primula family, closely related to Cyclamen and Primrose.

The form I’ve been growing for the past few decades is actually referred to as Dodecatheon meadia Alba. It’s a pure white form and just so happens to be wonderfully fragrant. From a basal rosette, when there’s not much else going on in the garden, multiple, sturdy, wiry stems emerge and shoot skyward to 24″ tall. Seemingly overnight, clusters of upright buds, each on its own wiry little stem, appear. As these swelling buds age, they slowly turn downwards and open to create delightfully, unusually shaped pendulous flowers that “hang around” for quite a while.

The pollinated flowers set copious amounts of seed and before you know it, you’ll have your own natural colony of Shooting Stars.

Being a woodland plant, they naturally occur in the shade, but can easily handle sun as there really are no leaves on the trees in the early time of Spring that these guys are up and out. Dodecatheon meadia doesn’t appear to be too concerned about soil type or texture, pH or moisture conditions.

And as an added benefit, as with other members of this family such as Primroses, the deer pay them no mind.

OH! I almost forgot to tell you what really cool cut flowers they make.

Pretty versatile plant, huh?

 

I’ve been building a good stock of plants to share with you and if your ground is frozen, not to worry, as you can specify the shipdate for your particular area in a provided space on our online PDF orderform.

What you’ll receive are large, 3 year old bareroot plants. They’ll arrive wrapped in long fibered, unmilled sphagnum moss. This material is antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral and a very useful material.

The prices shown below include FREE SHIPPING on bareroot plants out of their 2″ pots. If you would like to receive the plants undisturbed, in their pots, please add .95¢ per plant to cover the extra cost of shipping soil and pots.

7   for $ 35.00  delivered ($5.00 ea)
10  for $ 45.00  delivered ($4.50 ea)
15  for $ 60.00  delivered ($4.00 ea)
20  for $ 70.00  delivered ($3.50 ea)
50  for $150.00  delivered ($3.00 ea)

Larger quantities at even lower prices upon request.

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just fill out the order form athttp://www.sunfarm.com/orderform.pdf

Most of our previous weekly specials are still available. Go to –http://sunfarm.com/specials/ to browse the archives.

By the way, if you haven’t read the story in GQ magazine about me, you can read it on line at http://sunfarm.com/images/GVQ08-2.pdf

This is a retail mailing. If you are a nursery, garden center, landscape architect or garden designer etc, please make sure that you are also on my wholesale mailing list by emailing me at my personal email address – barry@sunfarm.com – with the words WHOLESALE LIST in all caps in the subject line.

Erythronium americanum
I still haven’t figured out the origins of the four most popular “Common Names” for Erythronium americanum, “Dog Tooth Violet”, “Fawn Lily”, “Trout Lily” and “Adder’s Tongue”. Hell, I don’t even know what an “Adder” is! However, I have an inkling that the name “Trout Lily” has something to do with the colorful marbling of the foliage resembling the markings on a trout. Or perhaps the way the pendulous flowers hang resembling a canine’s uppers? In any case, here’s a plant that everyone needs to have in their garden. One of the first flowers to bloom in a long series of native ephemeral wildflowers, Erythronium americanum lights up the garden with its curious, pendulous, bright yellow, long lasting flowers.

Erythronium americanum, a plant in Liliaceae (The Lily Family), grows from a deep bulb and is native to almost the entire eastern US and Canada – http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=ERAM5 and will grow easily anywhere in the world.

From bare ground, they seem to appear almost magically overnight with their supple, dramatically painted foliage. Then about a week later, wiry little flower stems start inching up from the center with their tight little buds ready to ready to open and signal the end of Winter and beginning of Spring.

Strangely enough, Erythronium, the name of the genus, is derived from the Greek word, Erythros, which means red. This is probably a reference to some of the other species that have red or pink flowers such as found at my friend, John Lonsdale’s, website – http://www.edgewoodgardens.net/Plants_album/The%20Plants%20-%20%20Complete%20Collection/Liliaceae/Erythronium/index6.html John is one of the most adept Plantsmen and Photographers in the world. His website is methodically indexed and I warn you, if you visit there – http://www.edgewoodgardens.net/index.html you can be happily lost for hours, but will leave a much more knowledgeable gardener.

My friend, Tom Barnes, captured a great closeup of the flower – http://sunfarm.com/images/erambarnescu.jpg

There is also a rarer, white counterpart to this species and that’s Erythronium albidum. If you have a “White Garden” or love white flowers, I do have a somewhat limited stock of this very difficult to find, but easy to grow plant.

Besides these two species of Erythronium, there are several others worldwide. The Pacific Bulb Society has  3 wonderfully illustrated pages to educate you about the genus –http://www.pacificbulbsociety.org/pbswiki/index.php/ErythroniumTwo. This link is for the first page, species A-G, and there are two links at the top and bottom of this page for species H-O and P-Z. There is also an index page at – http://www.pacificbulbsociety.org/pbswiki/index.php/Erythronium

I’ve never seen this plant bothered by squirrels, rabbits, deer or any other plant predators. It seems very willing to set seed, but seedlings take 3-5 years to mature into flowering plants. So, with a bit of patience, you can have lovely drifts of yellow blooms. Imagine a sea of bright yellow for weeks every Spring – http://www.fs.fed.us/wildflowers/regions/rockymountain/WestElkScenicByway/images/erythronium-grandiflorum-lg.jpg

As I’ve implied, Erythronium americanum is a “no brainer” to grow. People ask me about growing conditions and I tell them that average soil is fine. They are typically a woodland plant and grow naturally in a variety of conditions but I’ve never seen them in wet or soggy soil. As far as shade or sun requirements go, at the time they are up and performing their magic, there are no leaves on the trees anyway. So, as I see it, they can take some sun.

I’ve been building a good stock of Erythronium americanum to share with you and if your ground is still frozen, not to worry, as you can specify the shipdate for your particular area in a provided space on our online PDF orderform.

What you’ll receive are large, 5 year old bareroot blooming size bulbs in full, active growth. They’ll arrive wrapped in long fibered, unmilled sphagnum moss. This material is antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral and a very useful material.

The prices shown below include FREE SHIPPING on bareroot plants out of their 2″ pots. If you would like to receive the plants undisturbed, in their pots, please add .95¢ per plant to cover the extra cost of shipping soil and pots.

7   for $ 35.00  delivered ($5.00 ea)
10  for $ 45.00  delivered ($4.50 ea)
15  for $ 60.00  delivered ($4.00 ea)
20  for $ 70.00  delivered ($3.50 ea)
50  for $150.00  delivered ($3.00 ea)

Larger quantities at even lower prices upon request.

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just fill out the order form at http://www.sunfarm.com/orderform.pdf

Euphorbia 'Jessie'
Who????????? Jessie, that’s who!

Euphorbia ‘Jessie’ is the first plant that I’ve felt was worthy of patenting. She’s an interspecific Euphorbia hybrid, a cross between E. griffithii and E. polychroma and she brings the best qualities of both her parents into a dramatic 48″ to 60″ plant. In case you’re unfamiliar with these particular species of Euphorbia or with the genus Euphorbia in general, I’ll educate you a bit about the Euphorbia family.

Euphorbia is a genus of plants belonging to the family Euphorbiaceae. Consisting of about 2160 species, Euphorbia is one of the most diverse genera in the plant kingdom. Members of the family and genus are sometimes referred to as Spurges. The genus is primarily found in the tropical and subtropical regions of Africa and the Americas, but also in temperate zones worldwide. Succulent species originate mostly from Africa, the Americas and Madagascar. There exists a wide range of insular species, namely on the Hawaiian Islands where spurges are collectively known as “Akoko”.

The common name “Spurge” derives from the Middle English/Old French espurge (“to purge”), due to the use of the plants sap as a purgative.

The botanical name Euphorbia derives from Euphorbus, the Greek physician of King Juba II of Numidia (52-50 BC – 23 AD). He is reported to have used a certain plant, possibly “Resin Spurge” (E. resinifera), as a herbal remedy when the king suffered from a swollen belly. Carolus Linnaeus assigned the name Euphorbia to the entire genus in the physician’s honor.

Juba II himself was a noted patron of the arts and sciences and sponsored several expeditions and biological research. He also was a notable author, writing several scholarly and popular scientific works such as treatises on natural history and a best-selling traveller’s guide to Arabia. Euphorbia regisjubae (King Juba’s Euphorbia) was named to honor the king’s contributions to natural history and his role in bringing the genus to notice.

Euphorbia griffithii is named in honor of Dr William Griffith (1810 – 1845) a medical doctor with the British East India Company and a dedicated botanist who collected widely in Upper Burma, India and Afghanistan.

Euphorbia griffithii is a native of Bhutan and south-east Tibet where it grows in mixed oak, pine and rhododendron forests. It is an herbaceous perennial with wide ranging, creeping underground rhizomes and annual growths from 50 to 80cm (20 – 30″). Although I consider it a very worthy garden plant, it’s sprawling habit leaves a bit to be desired.

The other parent involved in the creation of ‘Jessie’ is Euphorbia polychroma, a yellow flowering native of Eastern and Central Europe. This species tends to seed around the garden aggressively. The resulting progeny of the marriage of these two diverse species is sterile and sets no seeds.

The vivid yellow color of ‘Jessie’s’ bracts is so intense that it melts onto the top leaves.  Each bract is edged with a brilliant orange rim.  E. ‘Jessie’ has been granted Plant Patent # 12858 by the US Government Patent Office and is also protected by the COPF,  the Canadian Ornamental Plant Foundation. Asexual propagation is forbidden.

By the way, Euphorbias are among the most deer proof plants in the world and ‘Jessie’ is no exception. Herds of deer have browsed all around her and NEVER taken a single bite.

In case you’re wondering where the name ‘Jessie’ comes from, it’s for my friend Jessica Levine, a local artist / community activist – http://www.dottywood.org/ On a Summer meander through my garden, Jessie, surrounded by all forms of greenery, exclaimed “Hey, Barry, why is that one plant so different than all of the other plants around it?”  And different it was! The curious eye of an artist observed a spontaneous, naturally occurring interspecific cross between two species. Her discovery prompted me to begin experimenting with Euphorbias and to name the plant in her honor.

I’m zone 5 here and we know she’s hardy here for the last 7 years. I’d venture a guess that she’ll grow well in any state of the US. As far as heat tolerance, my friend Jimmy Turner at the Dallas Arboretum in Dallas TX reported that she didn’t blink an eye in 100 degree sun with 100 % RH, now that’s one tough plant.

I grow her in full sun and the height is over 6 feet. In shade, you can expect 4 feet to 5 feet. A mature clump can be up to 3 feet in diameter.

Bloom time is the entire month of June here and it’s now August and the plants all still look great.

I’ve been selling Euphorbia ‘Jessie’ in limited quantities to visitors to the farm and to select Internet customers in 2″ treeband ® pots for $17.50 ea plus $9.00 for UPS. Over the last couple of years, we’ve really put some effort into building a large stock so as to be able to reduce the price and I’m pleased to tell you that I’ve succeeded.

The prices shown below include FREE SHIPPING on bareroot plants out of their 2″ pots. If you would like to receive the plants undisturbed, in their pots, please add .95¢ per plant to cover the extra cost of shipping soil and pots.

1   for $ 20.00  delivered ($20.00 ea)
2   for $ 30.00  delivered ($15.00 ea)
4   for $ 50.00  delivered ($12.50 ea)
10  for $ 95.00  delivered ($ 9.50 ea)

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just fill out the order form athttp://www.sunfarm.com/orderform.pdf

Galtonia candicans
I don’t know why this extremely hardy, bulbous perennial from South Africa isn’t in everyone’s garden. A lovely, deer-proof member of the Hyacinth family and formerly a member of the Lily family, Galtonia candicans has been at home in my gardens for over 20 years and seems to uncannily coordinate the commencement of its long bloom period with the Summer Solstice, almost to the day. I have it growing in full shade and in full sun, in average soil, in dry soil and in moist soil. It seems to do equally well in all of the aforementioned locations and conditions although it grows noticeably taller in full sun.

Galtonia candicans is a perfect plant for something of height in that “White Garden” you’ve been dreaming of creating for years now. Even when it’s not in flower, the supple, almost succulent 2″ – 3″ wide, 12″ – 24″ long flowing foliage is a great presence in your garden. In foliage, the plant is 24″ – 36″ tall and in flower, the stems tower up to 48″! As they slowly open from bottom to top, the pendulous, icy white, fragrant bells arch gently away from the main stem and stay open for days and days. You’ll eagerly embrace the tall, sturdy flower stems as a long lasting cut flower.

They’ve survived many subzero nights, at times, without snow cover and I would say that they are probably hardy in just about every state on the mainland US. As they grow older, the plants become more massive and produce more and more flower stems. They’ll also gently seed themselves into a striking colony.

Galtonia candicans grows in South Africa on the slopes of the Drakensberg in Mpumalanga, Free State, KwaZulu-Natal, Lesotho and the Eastern Cape at altitudes of 4000 – 7000 feet. There are a few other species in the genus Galtonia and of late I’ve become quite fond of the diminutive, graceful Galtonia viridiflora and have spent the last couple of years seriously collecting seed of it and hope to add it to my plant offerings next year.

 

I’ve been collecting seeds of Galtonia candicans for years now and finally have a large enough quantity to share with the gardening public.

What you’ll receive are bareroot, 3 year old bulbs in active growth, these 6 mm – 10 mm bulbs should bloom for you next year. They’ll come wrapped in pre-moistened, long fibered, unmilled sphagnum moss. This material is antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral and a very useful material. I also have a good stock of Galtonia candicans in 2″ deep pots and if you would rather have them arrive in the pots, add .95¢ per plant to cover the extra cost of shipping.

The prices shown below include FREE SHIPPING on bareroot plants out of their 2″ pots. If you would like to receive the plants undisturbed, in their pots, please add .95¢ per plant to cover the extra cost of shipping soil and pots.

3   for $ 25.00  delivered ($8.35 ea)
7   for $ 50.00  delivered ($7.15 ea)
12  for $ 75.00  delivered ($6.25 ea)
20  for $100.00  delivered ($5.00 ea)

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just fill out the order form at http://www.sunfarm.com/orderform.pdf

Geum Georgenberg
Judging from the phenomenal way in which Gladiolus ‘Boone’ was received by the gardening public, and knowing that the color Apricot is so very unusual in the plant world, I’ve high hopes that Geum ‘Georgenberg’ will be embraced to the same degree. Out of all the Geum selections that I currently grow, have grown in the past, or have seen in other gardens, I have to say that on so many rating criteria, this one is the best!!! Besides the Apricot color, the way the flowers are presented is very important to me. In all of the other Geums that I’ve grown or seen, the flowers are held on gangly stems high above the plant. On Geum ‘Georgenberg’ the flowers are on very rigid stems, held much closer to the plant.

 

Commonly known as “Avens”, the genus Geum is in the Rosaceae (Rose) family. I grow them in full sun and full shade. They seem to prefer the sun and this particular cultivar is very generous in producing an abundance of offspring in its tight, compact, round clump. Plant height is 3″ to 6″ and in a couple of years, they’ll form an almost perfectly round 12″ plant with dozens of divisions that you can share with your friends.

 

And……. they’re tough as nails! Left outside in pots, they’ve never blinked an eye at single digit temperatures with no snow cover. Not only that, but the deer, rabbits and other varmints have never touched them.

I’ve a good bit of Geum ‘Georgenburg’ to share with you now. What you’ll receive are bareroot, flowering size 3 year old plants out of 2″ pots, with their roots wrapped in long fibered, unmilled sphagnum moss. This material is antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral and a very useful material to recycle. If you’d rather have them arrive in their pots, please add $.95 per plant to cover the extra cost of shipping.

The prices shown below include FREE SHIPPING on bareroot plants out of their 2″ pots. If you would like to receive the plants undisturbed, in their pots, please add .95¢ per plant to cover the extra cost of shipping soil and pots.

7 for $ 35.00 delivered  ($5.00 ea)
10 for $ 45.00 delivered ($4.50 ea)
15 for $ 60.00 delivered ($4.00 ea)
20 for $ 70.00 delivered ($3.50 ea)
50 for $150.00 delivered ($3.00 ea)

Larger quantities at even lower prices upon request.

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just fill out the order form at http://www.sunfarm.com/orderform.pdf

Gladiolus 'Boone'
I LOVE apricots, but I’ve NEVER seen an apricot colored flower until I saw Gladiolus ‘Boone’. This unusual plant has been the cornerstone of my cut flower garden for over a decade now. It was discovered by Jeff Owen, a County Extension Agent in Avery County, NC at an abandoned homestead in Boone NC, and given to Dick Bir, the native woody plant guru and author of “Growing and Propagating Showy Native Woody Plants”. Dick is an all around great guy and brilliant plantsman. He gave a few corms to world famous plantsman Alan Bush, the former proprietor of the late Holbrook Nursery in Fletcher, NC. This mysterious plant was so intriguing that they searched and searched for information, and even consulted with Gus DeHertogh, a leading authority on bulbs, but to no avail. So to this day, its origins and lineage remain an elusive mystery, but its beauty, hardiness and value in the garden are strikingly obvious.

As I said, it’s been a resident of my cut flower garden for many years now and even here in these Zone 5 gardens, (The USDA jokingly tells us that we are Zone 6) and through some brutal winters, it has remained hardy WITHOUT lifting for winter storage. Not only that, it is so prolific and produces so many new corms once established, that in a couple of years, you will have close to 100 plants with multiple flower stems that open over an extended period with that gorgeous apricot flavor. If you’ve been turned off to Glads after seeing those gaudy, overbred “funeral” glads, fret not! This plant has an elegant sophistication that puts it into a class of its own.

Are you sold on ‘Boone’ yet?

The prices shown below include FREE SHIPPING on bareroot plants out of their 2″ pots. If you would like to receive the plants undisturbed, in their pots, please add .95¢ per plant to cover the extra cost of shipping soil and pots.

3 for $ 25.00 delivered ($8.35 ea)
7 for $ 50.00 delivered ($7.15 ea)
12 for $ 75.00 delivered ($6.25 ea)
20 for $100.00 delivered ($5.00 ea)

 

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just download and print our order form and send it along with your check to:

Internet Order Department
Sunshine Farm & Gardens
HC 67 Box 539 B
Renick WV 24966 USA

Helleborus Niger
My most floriferous Helleborus niger(seen to the left) is the pollen parent of all the Helleborus nigerplants that I’m offering for sale now. I’ve sourced germplasm for the breeding work that I’ve been doing with this species for decades from every corner of the planet. If you’re not that familiar with this plant, lovingly referred to as the “Christmas Rose”, I’ll mention that it’s actually the first Hellebore I grew over 30 years ago and the plant that spawned my continuing love affair with the genus Helleborus. These reliable, evergreen, hardy to probably zone 3 or 4, perennial plants are among the most long lived of all the perennial plant species and the very first to flower. In fact, their early flowering habit is the origin of the common name “Christmas Rose” as they are frequently in full bloom around mid to late December.

I grow them here in my zone 5 garden in full sun, full shade and in every situation imaginable and have found that the more sun I give them, the more flowers they give me. The only soil type they disdain is a soggy wet type. Their very large, 2″ – 5″ flowers are such a brilliant white, that you’ll practically have to don sunglass to gaze at them. The mature plants are just slightly smaller and more compact than their popular cousins, Helleborus x hybridus, the “Lenten Rose”, and their foliage seems to hug the ground rather than be as upright as Helleborus x hybridus. I like this feature as it goes a long way in smothering any weeds growing close to the plant. As with all the other species in the genus Helleborus, deer and other varmints have no interest in the flowers or the foliage and seem to turn their noses up at the whole planting.

As a cut flower, they’re excellent and long lasting too. This is a real bonus as there is usually nothing else flowering at this time of the year.

NOW is the perfect time to plant the “Christmas Rose” so they’ll have plenty of time to establish their anchoring roots before Winter is once again upon us.

Hey…… I’ll bet you’re wondering why a plant with such bright, white flowers has the specific epithet niger, a word that in botanical nomenclature means black, aren’t you? Well, niger refers to the dark color of the roots.

I’ve more than 2000 of my 4 year old “Christmas Roses” for your garden in 2″ pots.

The prices shown below include FREE SHIPPING!!! on plants barerooted from those 2″ Anderson Treeband pots. If you’d rather have them arrive in their pots (recommended), please add $.95 per plant to cover the extra cost of shipping the pots and soil via Priority Mail.

7   for $ 35.00  delivered ($5.00 ea)
10  for $ 45.00  delivered ($4.50 ea)
15  for $ 60.00  delivered ($4.00 ea)
20  for $ 70.00  delivered ($3.50 ea)
50  for $150.00  delivered ($3.00 ea)

At this point I usually say “Larger quantities at even lower prices upon request”. But to be fair, I must limit you to one tray of 50 MAXIMUM.

If you have any questions about this plant or any of the other plants that I offer, send an email to my personal email address – barry@sunfarm.com and I’ll reply as quickly as I can. If you’d like a return phone call, please include your phone # and the best time to call.

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just fill out the order form at http://www.sunfarm.com/orderform.pdf

Helleborus x hybridus 'Sunshine Selections'
No matter where you live, whether you make your home in the snowy American Heartland, warm subtropical Florida, the frozen mountains of Maine, sunny southern California, or the moist Pacific Northwest, you can grow flowers like these in your own backyard.

Even if you believe that you’re cursed with a “Black Thumb”, you will succeed. That’s how easy they are.

Not only will they grace your table with beautiful cut flowers, they’ll provide color in your landscape at a time when there virtually is none. And….they’re such long lived perennials that they’ll still be thriving when they plant you in the ground.

The ‘Sunshine Selections’ of Helleborus x hybridus are the result of over 30 years of painstaking attention to detail, careful parental selection, worldwide searching for the best germplasm and hand pollination. These evergreen, long lived, deerproof, perennial plants are guaranteed to reward you with a continual bloom in Feb, Mar, Apr and May. I’ve been addicted to Hellebores for quite some time now and I’d love to share my obsession with you by inviting you to come see more than 6 acres of Hellebores in full bloom. The best time for peak bloom is mid March – mid April. Please email me for an appointment.

By the way, these glorious images were captured here on the farm by my friend and Photographer Extraordinaire, Ralph Anderson for a story about me written by my friend and Writer Extraordinaire Gene Bussell. That article can be found on page 84 of the January issue of Southern Living Magazine. You can read the full story here.

I’d love to share the fruits of my labor with you and if you read on, you’ll discover a very attractive and easy way to start your own addiction.

What I’ll be sending you are 2 year old, bareroot plants out of our 2″ Anderson Treeband Pots® in full active growth. They’ll arrive with their roots wrapped in long fibered, unmilled sphagnum moss. This material is antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral and a very useful material.

I also have a limited quantity of 5″ deep pots of older, more mature plants and a large volume of our earlier hybrids in the softer, pastel shades, which some people even prefer, at much lower prices. Email me for info on these plants. You can see the difference between the 2 sizes at – http://sunfarm.com/images/2in5inpots.jpg

There’s also a place on our order form to specify a shipdate, so you have the option to wait until Spring or a later date if your ground is still frozen, or to get them now and keep them on a windowsill, watching them grow until you are ready to plant them outside.

The prices shown below include FREE SHIPPING on bareroot plants out of their 2″ pots. If you would like to receive the plants undisturbed, in their pots, ( RECOMMENDED ) please add .95¢ per plant to cover the extra cost of shipping soil and pots.

7   for $ 35.00  delivered ($5.00 ea)
10  for $ 45.00  delivered ($4.50 ea)
15  for $ 60.00  delivered ($4.00 ea)
20  for $ 70.00  delivered ($3.50 ea)
50  for $150.00  delivered ($3.00 ea)

Larger quantities at even lower prices upon request.

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just fill out the order form at http://www.sunfarm.com/orderform.pdf

The "Other" Hellebores
Poor, poor Hellebore foetidus! Their common name, “The Stinking Hellebore”, has caused them to be overlooked as the fantastic garden plants that they are. This incredibly variable species has the most graceful palmate foliage of any of the species within the genus Helleborus and are very easy to grow. There really is no “stink”, but if you crush the foliage, you’ll get a very strong chlorophyll fragrance. The delicate, sexy foliage is the main motive for growing this plant, but the flowers, which occur in late Winter and early Spring, are interesting also. Another common name for Hellebore foetidus is “The Bearsfoot Hellebore”.

Hellebore foetidus is hardy in every state of the U.S. and are perhaps the hardiest of all Hellebores. In most areas, a couple hours of sun are appreciated and only in the deep South do they require full shade.

The only way I’ve been able to kill a Helleborus foetidus is to plant it in a wet area. Needless to say, good drainage is very important. As far as longevity goes, there’s no comparison to Helleborus x hybridus, but they do seed around happily and you’ll always have them in your garden.

Variability is the main calling card for this species and there are several named cultivars. These are all seed strains and are not vegetatively propagated, although I’ve had some success in rooting main stem cuttings.

I’m offering you an opportunity here to own the following plants in sets of 5, 1 each of 4 different cultivars and 1 plant of the pure species. I’ll tell you a little bit about each:

Helleborus foetidus ‘Miss Jekyll’ – ‘Miss Jekyll’ is named for famous British Plantswoman and garden designer Gertrude Jekyll and has more of an upright, standard, tree like habit, sometimes attaining a height of over 3 feet. The foliage also tends to be more glossy than the species. You can read more about Gertie at http://www.gertrudejekyll.co.uk/

Helleborus foetidus ‘Silvertooth’ – One of my own selections, all descended from a plant that had a very soft, silvery, greyish cast to the foliage. Check it out –http://sunfarm.com/plantlist/hellebores/helleborusfoetidussilvertooth-m.jpg

Helleborus foetidus ‘Sopron’ – A selection from world famous Hellebore collector, Will McLewin. ‘Sopron’ has always taken on a lovely shrub like habit –http://sunfarm.com/plantlist/hellebores/helleborusfoetidussopron1-m.jpg

Helleborus foetidus The pure species – As I said, a very variable plant and if you want to have some fun, take a # 7 paint brush when these guys are in flower and dab some pollen from each plant onto the others and you’ll get a bunch of different results, all viable plants and maybe one worth naming!

Helleborus foetidus ‘Frenchy’ The seeds for this selection came from a fellow in the French Alps, hence the name. It has some unique reddish coloration at the base of the petioles. If you’d like to see more images of, see this mini-gallery of Helleborus foetidus ‘Frenchy’. You’ll be amazed!

A set includes 1 plant each of Helleborus foetidus ‘Miss Jekyll’, Helleborus foetidus ‘Sopron’ Helleborus foetidus ‘Silvertooth’, Helleborus foetidus ‘Frenchy’, and Helleborus foetidus the pure species.

The prices shown below include FREE SHIPPING on bareroot plants out of their 2″ pots. If you would like to receive the plants undisturbed, in their pots, please add .95¢ per plant to cover the extra cost of shipping soil and pots.

Sets Plants  Each Plant    Each Set      Total
1    5       $9.00         $45.00        $45.00
2    10      $8.00         $40.00        $80.00
3    15      $7.00         $35.00        $105.00
4    20      $6.00         $30.00        $120.00
5    25      $6.00         $30.00        $150.00

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just download and print our order form and send it along with your check to:

Internet Order Department
Sunshine Farm & Gardens
HC 67 Box 539 B
Renick WV 24966 USA

Hemerocallis thunbergii
Imagine a daylily 84″ tall. That’s 7 feet! And imagine one that has sturdy flower stems with brilliant yellow flowers and an intense sweet fragrance. Well, imagine no more, because it exists. I’m describing Hemerocallis thunbergii, a native of Japan, and an essential, worthwhile addition to any perennial garden. As with most Hemerocallis, this is quite the easy plant to grow. I grow it in full sun and it makes a 24″ -36″ wide clump in just a couple of years.

Blooming over a long period of time, from June through August, the flowers open around mid afternoon and stay open through the following morning.  In their native habitat, they are most likely pollinated by night flying moths. Since I have no Japanese night flying moths here in WV, I hand pollinate the flowers to insure a good seed set by taking the pollen rich anthers of one flower and delicately dab them onto the stigma of another. I try to cross pollinate one plant with another to assure genetic diversity.

The seeds are sown outside so as to let Mother Nature do her thing. They’ll germinate the following Spring and we even get a flower or two that first year. They’ll all flower the following year. Clumps can be divided very easily in the early Spring before growth commences.

Hemerocallis thunbergii has graced my gardens reliably since 1993 when my friend Nagao Matsubayashi sent me seeds that he collected on Mt Ryoko in Japan.

I asked my daughter, Abbey Jo, who is just shy of 5 1/2 feet tall, to stand next to a plant of Hemerocallis thunbergii that was planted from a 2″ pot a year ago. It’s already over 6 feet tall and will reach its full height potential next year.

As you most likely already know, Hemerocallis appreciate full sun and are hardy virtually everywhere and this species is no exception. I have a limited amount of 2-year-old plants growing in 2″ pots that I can bareroot and ship to you. Now is a good time to plant them as they’ll have plenty of time to establish themselves before Winter.

The prices shown below include FREE SHIPPING on bareroot plants out of their 2″ pots. If you would like to receive the plants undisturbed, in their pots, please add .95¢ per plant to cover the extra cost of shipping soil and pots.

3   for $ 30.00  delivered ($10.00 ea)
7   for $ 50.00  delivered ($ 7.15 ea)
15  for $ 90.00  delivered ($ 6.00 ea)

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just fill out the order form athttp://www.sunfarm.com/orderform.pdf

Most of our previous weekly specials are still available. Go to –http://sunfarm.com/specials/ to browse the archives.

Hepatica acutiloba
I’ve been breeding and selecting Hepatica acutiloba and Hepatica americana for the last eight years now, specifically for silvery marbled foliage. In the process, I’ve accumulated a very large stock of lovely, white flowered Hepatica acutiloba with medium green foliage that I’d like to share with you at a very special price that includes FREE SHIPPING.

In the unlikely event that you’re unfamiliar with the genus Hepatica, I’ll tell you that Hepaticas are one of the most reliable, durable, desirable and perennial early Spring native wildflowers. They’re exceptionally long flowering, long lived and very easy to grow. The genus Hepatica is a member of the Ranunculaceae family, the same family as Actaea, Cimicifuga, Helleborus and Thalictrum, et al. Culture is super easy as in nature they grow in woodland conditions, typically in rich, but well drained soil. In captivity, they thrive happily in the shade garden and love a bit of dappled sunlight,  but don’t mind deep shade at all. The foliage is persistent and attractive all the growing season long. The height is 3″ – 6″ tall and a mature clump can be up to 12″ in diameter with more than 50 flowers. They’re native to almost every state east of the Mississippi and their hardiness and heat tolerance is most likely zones 4 – 10. Division and seed are my preferred methods of propagation.

By the way, the genus name, Hepatica, comes from the ancient Latin word, Hepaticus, which means liver, as the shape of the leaves resemble the human liver. In fact, in these mountains, the locals refer to Hepatica as “Liverleaf”.

I’ve been selling Hepatica acutiloba plants bareroot for $10.00 ea plus $9.00 for UPS.  As a result of my breeding work, I’ve managed to accumulate a nice little stockpile of surplus plants and can now drastically reduce the price. The prices shown below include FREE SHIPPING on bareroot plants out of their 2″ pots. If you would like to receive the plants undisturbed, in their pots, please add .95¢ per plant to cover the extra cost of shipping soil and pots.

7   for $ 35.00  delivered ($5.00 ea)
10  for $ 45.00  delivered ($4.50 ea)
15  for $ 60.00  delivered ($4.00 ea)
20  for $ 70.00  delivered ($3.50 ea)
50  for $150.00  delivered ($3.00 ea)

 

OH…………If you’d like to see some of the results of my Hepatica breeding work, go to –http://sunfarm.com/images/hacutilobamarble1.jpg I hope to make these stunning plants available to the gardening public sometime in 2008.

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just download and print our order form and send it along with your check to:

Internet Order Department
Sunshine Farm & Gardens
HC 67 Box 539 B
Renick WV 24966 USA

Hexastylis Virginica
Here’s an extraordinarily exciting, exquisite example of an extremely beautiful, exceedingly rare, extra nice, exceptionally easy to grow exotic plant that you will not find offered for sale anywhere else in the universe. I’m very excited to be able to share this exclusive treasure with you.

Let me explain.

Hexastylis virginica is a native, evergreen “Wild Ginger” with the most beautiful, thick, supple, glossy, silvery marbled foliage you’ve ever seen. There’s not a soul that could examine this plant and experience its radiance without exclaiming with exuberance and excitement that they’ve never experienced a plant that exemplifies and exhibits such a dramatic presence.

I can’t extol the exhilarating beauty of Hexastylis virginica enough. In fact, it’s so unusual that you’d better be careful that no one expatriates this somewhat slow growing ground cover from your garden while you’re not guarding it.

Hexastylis virginica is native to 9 Southeastern states but is probably hardy just about everywhere. Perhaps because it hugs Terra Firma so tightly, deer, rabbits and other critters pay it no mind.

And……… you’ll exert very little effort as it’s so easy to grow Hexastylis virginica aka “Virginia Heartleaf”, that it will exonerate even the most inept, non expert gardener. Dappled sunlight, or light to deep shade in average to well drained soils are its preferences. You can expect a mature plant of this long lived perennial groundcover to spread to about 12″ in just a few years.

 

Here’s a mature plant in the garden at MT Cuba Center. Take a peek at this closeup of the unusual flowers. Good companions for Hexastylis virginica are Hosta, Hellebores, Trilliums, Iris cristata, Iris verna, Hepaticas and so many more. Use your imagination and come up with your own combinations, or just create a drift of brightness in the shade with this plant alone.

It’s my pleasure to finally have a good enough supply to share with you.

Pricing follows:

You can have 3 of my little darlings in 2 3/8″ X 2 3/8″ X 5″ deep pots for $ 50.00

Shipping & Handling via INSURED PRIORITY MAIL is FREE!!!

I usually offer larger quantities of most plants at lower prices, but in order to insure that no one misses out on this offering, I’ve limited the quantity to 3 plants per person.

 

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just fill in the online pdf order form at http://www.sunfarm.com/orderform.pdf print it out and mail it with your check, we’ll send your plants out the same day.

 

 

Hydrastis canadensis
Golden will be the first word to enter your mind when you see the roots, rhizomes and dormant buds of Hydrastis canadensis. You’ll understand immediately why the common name is “Goldenseal”.  This very useful native woodland plant will not only charm and entertain you Spring, Summer and Autumn, it can even heal you. Well…….I’d better be careful not to prescribe here and let my friend Stephen Foster tell you about the health benefits ofHydrastis canadensis. I will say that I have used it successfully to cure sore throats and to treat cold and influenza symptoms.

Hydrastis canadensis is native to almost every state east of the Mississippi and will grow happily in just about any soil conditions. I would guess that hardiness and heat tolerance are USDA zones 4-10.

I grow Hydrastis canadensis in several places in my gardens, from full shade to dappled sunlight. It makes a wonderful groundcover as the 6″-12″ leaves on 6″-12″ plants overlap and shade out weeds.

The large, medium green, deeply textured Oak/Maple shaped leaves stay rich and supple all the growing season long and make a perfect foil for their frilly white, ephemeral flowers in early Spring and their bright red, raspberry like fruit in Autumn.

Here are some evolutionary, seasonal images of Hydrastis canadensis from early Spring to late Autumn, emergence, and flower to fruit and here’s a beautiful hand colored botanical illustrationfrom days past showing all seasons and parts of the plant.

This long-lived native perennial is very easy to grow from seed and left to its own devices will make a lovely colony in just a few years.

 

As with all of the other members of the Ranunculaceae family, the voluminous herds of deer that traverse my farm daily have NEVER touched this graceful plant.

I’ve built up a good stock of “Goldenseal” to share with you, and promise that you’ll really enjoy growing it and watching its seasonal changes

I’ll be sending you large, 5 year old bareroot plants. They’ll arrive on your doorstep with their roots wrapped in long fibered, unmilled sphagnum moss. This biodegradable material is antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral and a very useful recyclable material.

The prices shown below include FREE SHIPPING on bareroot plants out of their 2″ pots. If you would like to receive the plants undisturbed, in their pots, please add .95¢ per plant to cover the extra cost of shipping soil and pots.

4   for $ 25.00  delivered ($6.25 ea)
9   for $ 50.00  delivered ($5.50 ea)
15  for $ 75.00  delivered ($5.00 ea)
25  for $100.00  delivered ($4.00 ea)

Larger quantities at even lower prices upon request.

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just fill out the order form at http://www.sunfarm.com/orderform.pdf

 

 

Hymenocallis caroliniana
You’d think that a plant bearing flowers with such an exotic appearance would be temperamental, short lived and tricky to grow, but the truth is quite the contrary. Although everything about this delicate, fragile looking lady screams tropical, hot house beauty, the opposite couldn’t be more true. In fact, I’ve shared space in my brutal zone 5 garden with her for over 30 years.

I so look forward to this time of year when the thick, medium green, almost succulent foliage of the “Spider Lily”, seemingly overnight, sends up its 12″ – 24″ stems of pure, icy white blooms. They’re a real show stopper in full sun, full shade and everything in between. Average soil moisture is just fine, but they’re even happier in moister soils, and the more content they are, the more flower stems they’ll produce. I ask you, could they be any easier to grow???

And… they even hold up very well as cut flowers.

As a native member of the Amaryllis family, the genus Hymenocallis is home to over 20 speciesacross the Mid Atlantic and Southeastern regions of the US. The species I’m growing, Hymenocallis caroliniana, was formerly known as Hymenocallis occidentalis. Some taxonomists group them in the Lily family, but I’m sticking with Amaryllidaceae, and if you’re familiar with other Amaryllidaceae, you’ll agree. Planted in full sun they sometimes behave somewhat similar to Lycoris species aka “Resurrection Lilies”, by losing their foliage during the hot dry summer and then sending up their flower stems from bare ground in the late Summer – early Autumn. The name Hymenocallis is Greek and means beautiful membrane, referring to the thin membrane between the petals.

Hymenocallis caroliniana has a light, vanilla like fragrance, most likely to attract pollinators, not humans, as the dramatic beauty of the flowers do a great job of that. They usually set seed left to their own devices and are very easy to grow from seed. I take no chances though, and use a number 8 camel hair brush to dab pollen from one plant to another. I try to make sure that I put pollen from each plant onto a different one. This practice maintains their genetic diversity. Although they’re easy to grow from seeds, they can take 3 – 5 years to reach flowering size. For me, it’s a well needed exercise in patience, not one of my strongest suits. They’ll also make offset bulbs and in a few years, if they’re happy, you may have 5 or 6 bulbs in the clump that you can easily divide and replant in the Spring.

I have just over 500 of my 8-10 year old flowering size Hymenocallis caroliniana to share with you. I’ll carefully wrap them for their journey to your garden in long fibered, unmilled sphagnum moss. This material is antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral and a very useful material to recycle.

Pricing follows below:

1  for $ 15.00
3 for $ 40.00
5 for $ 60.00

Adding $4.95 to your order will cover the cost of Insured Priority Mail and you’ll have them 2 days after I receive your check.

In order to be fair, I won’t sell more than 5 to any one person. I’ll have more next year and hope to keep the pipeline full, so don’t fret if you miss out this year.

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just fill out the order form at http://www.sunfarm.com/orderform.pdf

Hypoxis hirsuta
There aren’t very many plants that would conjure up the use of the adjective “adorable” to describe them, but in this case I deem it justifiable.

Put on your sunglasses!!!

“Yellow Star Grass” is a VERY appropriate name for Hypoxis hirsuta, although the yellow color of the flowers is so brilliant, you may want to call it “Golden Star Grass”.  A plant native to all but nine western states on the mainland US and all but two western provinces of Canada –http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=HYHI2 Hypoxis hirsuta deserves a place in every type of garden. Its diminutive size makes it a perfect choice for a rock garden. However its woodland nature lends itself be perfect in any shade or wild garden and the fact that it loves to soak up the sun, makes it perfect for the front of any sunny perennial border.

Hypoxis hirsuta was a member of the Amaryllis family, but recently, taxonomists have created a new plant family, Hypoxidaceae.  The name of the genus, Hypoxis, is derived from the Greek, hypo which means below and oxy which means pointed and refers to the points of the petals. The species name, hirsuta, refers to the very fine hairs on the blades of the foliage. Hypoxis hirsuta is the only North American member of the family and of the genus. All of the others are South African –http://www.plantzafrica.com/planthij/hypoxis.htm

Hypoxis hirsuta grows to be about 3″ – 6″ tall with an equal spread. Eventually, they’ll gently self sow into a very natural colony. I’ve been building a good stock of plants to share with you and now is a good time to plant them.

What you’ll receive are bareroot plants in full, active growth. They’ll come to you wrapped in long fibered, unmilled sphagnum moss. This material is antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral and a very useful material.

The prices shown below include FREE SHIPPING on bareroot plants out of their 2″ pots. If you would like to receive the plants undisturbed, in their pots, please add .95¢ per plant to cover the extra cost of shipping soil and pots.

7   for $ 35.00  delivered ($5.00 ea)
10  for $ 45.00  delivered ($4.50 ea)
15  for $ 60.00  delivered ($4.00 ea)
20  for $ 70.00  delivered ($3.50 ea)
50  for $150.00  delivered ($3.00 ea)

Larger quantities at even lower prices upon request

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just fill out the order form at http://www.sunfarm.com/orderform.pdf

Iris verna
Iris verna is one of my very favorite spring wildflowers. I so look forward to the bright, bold yet delicate three dimensional blooms held tightly against the plant. The vivid colors stand out from a great distance and draw you ever closer. Being a very vigorous clump forming, long lived perennial, you never have to fret about it becoming a nuisance in the garden.

The native range of Iris verna encompasses 17 eastern states – http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=IRVEbut it has been hardy for folks all over the US and Canada.

Standing about 6″ – 10″ tall, at maturity Iris verna will form an approximately 12″ plant. What a useful plant at the front of a border, along a walkway or as a stand alone statement in a bed of its own in the wild or formal garden!

I’ve grown this easy Iris in full sun to deep shade and performance is equal in each location, although in the wild, it prefers light shade to dappled sunlight. Moisture requirements are average to moist.

OH, I forgot to mention a very important point!!! Iris verna is 100 % deerproof.

I’ve been building a good stock of plants to share with you and now is a good time to plant them.

What you’ll receive are 2 year old bareroot plants in full, active growth. They’ll arrive on your doorstep with their roots wrapped in long fibered, unmilled sphagnum moss. This material is antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral and a very useful material.

The prices shown below include FREE SHIPPING on bareroot plants out of their 2″ pots. If you would like to receive the plants undisturbed, in their pots, please add .95¢ per plant to cover the extra cost of shipping soil and pots.

7   for $ 35.00  delivered ($5.00 ea)
10  for $ 45.00  delivered ($4.50 ea)
15  for $ 60.00  delivered ($4.00 ea)
20  for $ 70.00  delivered ($3.50 ea)
50  for $150.00  delivered ($3.00 ea)

Larger quantities at even lower prices upon request

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just fill out the order form athttp://www.sunfarm.com/orderform.pdf

Most of our previous weekly specials are still available. Go to – http://sunfarm.com/specials/ to browse the archives.

Jeffersonia diphylla
I’d probably get in trouble with someone if this email was about our current President, so I won’t even mention what an idiot he is. That way, if there are any Republicans on my mailing list, they won’t be offended. After all, my mother still tells me not to discuss sex, religion or politics with yada yada yada.

Anyway, I wasn’t referring to our current President.  I was referring to our 3rd President, Thomas Jefferson, and the plant named to honor his memory and all of the wonderful things that he’s done for agriculture and horticulture, Jeffersonia diphylla. You can read more about Jefferson and his home Monticello at –http://www.monticello.org/

Jeffersonia diphylla is an early blooming, long lived, shade perennial that’s extremely hardy and very easy to grow in virtually any climate. One glance at the image and you’ll instantly understand why the common name is “Twinleaf”.

 

At maturity, the height is 12″ – 24″. Its spread can be up to 24″ and its imposing stature is almost shrublike. The pure white flowers are about an inch across and although very ephemeral, they are produced in abundance and make a striking display. One of the neatest things about Jeffersonia is the unique seed capsules, however, I can’t find a picture to show you. Oh, oh!  Wait a minute. I just found one – http://www.cas.vanderbilt.edu/bioimages/image/j/jedi–frdevel34473.htm Wish I could find an image of the capsules opening with the seeds pouring out, but here’s a nice botanical illustration – http://www.science-art.com/gallery/11/11_8252004164753.jpg

I know of no insect, pest or disease problems affecting Jeffersonia and the foliage stays attractive the growing season long, a very unusual attribute for such an early Spring wildflower.

It’s hard to believe that the genus Jeffersonia is in the same family as Barberry, the Berberidaceae family. There are many other desirable plants in this family such as Epimedium and Podophyllum and one of my other favorites, Diphylleia cymosa –http://sunfarm.com/picks/diphylleiacymosa-115422.phtml.

A good image of Jeffersonia diphylla in flower can be found at – http://web.bsu.edu/fseec/environment/ECI/FloraECI/jeffersonia_diphylla_flower3.jpgand an awesome close up at –http://botany.wisc.edu/wisflora/pictures/xl_photos/JEFDIP_TSC_XL.jpg

A related Asian species exists, Jeffersonia dubia. You can read more about Jeffersonia dubia at the North American Rock Garden Society (NARGS) website –http://www.nargs.org/potm/potm_may02.html

I’ve been selling Jeffersonia diphylla in 5″ deep treeband ® pots for $17.50 ea plus $9.00 for UPS. Over the last few years, we’ve really put some effort into building a large stock so as to be able to reduce the price and I’m pleased to tell you that we have succeeded.  The prices shown below include FREE SHIPPING on bareroot plants out of their 2″ pots. If you would like to receive the plants undisturbed, in their pots, please add .95¢ per plant to cover the extra cost of shipping soil and pots.

2   for $ 30.00  delivered ($15.00 ea)
4   for $ 50.00  delivered ($12.50 ea)
10  for $ 95.00  delivered ($ 9.50 ea)

Please include your Postal and UPS addresses on a separate sheet of paper with your check.

Kniphofia thompsonii snowdenii
I fooled my guru. Brent Heath, co-owner of Brent and Becky’s Bulbs, with his lovely wife Becky, is more than just a friend and mentor to me. He’s my “Bulb Guru” and I’ve NEVER been able to stump him on a bulbous plant ID! That was until Kniphofia thompsonii snowdenii came along. It’s so unlike any Kniphofia species we’ve ever seen, that he mistakenly guessed it to be a Watsonia or Lachenalia, two other South African natives and members of Liliaceae and Iridaceae respectively. However they’re not hardy. In the unlikely event that you’re unfamiliar with the Latin name Kniphofia, you’ll probably recognize them by their common names, “Red Hot Pokers” or “Torch Lilies”. But as you can see by the soft, warm orange color of this species, they’re not all red. Not at all, in fact, there are yellows and creams and all kinds of shades of very warm colors.

The genus Kniphofia is primarily a South African native, but they’re easy to grow in virtually any location in the U.S. There are many named hybrid cultivars of Kniphofia available on the market and most of those commercially available are cultivars of Kniphofia uvaria.

Kniphofia thompsonii snowdenii, in addition to being extremely hardy, is very rhizomatous and in a year or two, you’ll have an attractive, large clump that produces multiple flowering stems. The pendulous, tubular 1″ – 2″ flowers on 12″ – 36″ rigid stems make GREAT cut flowers as they open slowly over their long flowering period in early to mid Summer. If this becomes your first acquisition in the genus Kniphofia, you’ll certainly be hooked and want more. If this is an addition to an existing Kniphofia collection, it will further stimulate your interest in the genus and you’ll soon be combing the Earth for more.

Although they do best in full sun to light shade in average soil, they can handle deep shade and/or dry soil.

I’d be pleased to share this welcome addition to any garden with you and I’ll be shipping them as vigorous, bareroot 2 year old plants that will flower for you next year. The prices shown below include FREE SHIPPING on bareroot plants out of their 2″ pots. If you would like to receive the plants undisturbed, in their pots, please add .95¢ per plant to cover the extra cost of shipping soil and pots.

7   for $ 35.00  delivered ($5.00 ea)
10  for $ 45.00  delivered ($4.50 ea)
15  for $ 60.00  delivered ($4.00 ea)
20  for $ 70.00  delivered ($3.50 ea)
50  for $150.00  delivered ($3.00 ea)
Quotes on larger quantities by request.      

 

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just download and print our order form and send it along with your check to:

Internet Order Department
Sunshine Farm & Gardens
HC 67 Box 539 B
Renick WV 24966 USA

Lamiastrum galeobdolon 'Herman's Pride'
I wish I knew who Herman was to thank him for this fantastic groundcover. Formerly in the genus Lamium, but moved to the monotypic genus Lamiastrum, Lamiastrum galeobdolon ‘Herman’s Pride’ may be a mouthful to pronounce but it’s an extremely useful groundcover. Even when not covered for weeks in brilliant canary yellow flowers, its silvery variegated foliage illuminates the shadiest of areas. And it’s a no brainer to grow! As a member of the “Mint” family, one would expect this plant to be invasive, but this is not the case. It’s a clumper rather than a runner and very well behaved.

My first experience with this gem of a plant was many years ago when my friends Pat and Pam Harper came to spend a weekend here. Pam is a world famous author of gardening books and her specialty is design. Some of her books include:

Pam was supposed to be on “Holiday” as the Brits call vacation, but she couldn’t be stopped from doing some garden design when she saw the extensive plethora of plant material and the large palette of space that we have here. She noticed a flat of Lamiastrum galeobdolon ‘Herman’s Pride’ and went on about how much she loved that plant. The next thing I knew, she was planting it under a bench. Was there going to be enough light to sustain its growth I asked? “No problem”, Pam said with a wry smile and a glance of self confidence. Well that was many years ago and it still pours out from under the bench and almost never fails to elicit a comment from visitors.

This long lived ground cover makes a clump about 12″ in diameter and gets about 12″ tall. It’s been hardy in my zone 5 garden for decades and I imagine it’s hardy to zone 4.

I’ve been selling Lamiastrum galeobdolon ‘Herman’s Pride’ in 2″ treeband ® pots for $7.50 ea plus $9.00 for UPS. Over the last few years, we’ve really put some effort into building a large stock so as to be able to reduce the price and I’m pleased to tell you that we have succeeded. The prices shown below include FREE SHIPPING on bareroot plants out of their 2″ pots. If you would like to receive the plants undisturbed, in their pots, please add .95¢ per plant to cover the extra cost of shipping soil and pots.

7 for $ 35.00 delivered ($5.00 ea)
10 for $ 45.00 delivered ($4.50 ea)
15 for $ 60.00 delivered ($4.00 ea)
20 for $ 70.00 delivered ($3.50 ea)
50 for $150.00 delivered ($3.00 ea)

 

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just download and print our order form and send it along with your check to:

Internet Order Department
Sunshine Farm & Gardens
HC 67 Box 539 B
Renick WV 24966 USA

 

Lilium superbum
The specific epithet for Lilium superbum is one of the most appropriate I’ve encountered – SUPERB, as the images below will speak for themselves without any embellishment from me.

Just about the entire eastern half of the US is home to natural populations of this plant –http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=LISUbut there isn’t a garden anywhere in the world where this beauty wouldn’t find itself happy to grow.

My friend Jim McKenney has graciously given me permission to share his image (below right) of a lovely specimen of Lilium superbum in his Maryland garden. Jim, a passionate plantsman, has an amazing garden. You can see a varied palette of this extraordinary plant collection at his blog – http://mcwort.blogspot.com/

I have a large, thriving stand of Lilium superbum growing naturally on my farm in the deep shade of the woods that had never flowered. Several years ago, a windstorm blew a few aged trees over letting some strong beams of sunlight shower the stand and all of a sudden, they started flowering. I transplanted a good bit to a sunny spot in a perennial border and they flower their heads off reliably every year now.

Lilium superbum grows from a stoloniferous bulbwith the “mother bulb” sending out new “daughter bulbs” every year. Propagation is easy from bulb scales however Lilium superbum also sets a prolific amount of seed. Although it takes several years to produce a flowering size bulb, it is very easy to grow a large quantity from seed. An illustration of lily bulb structure can be found at –http://www.the-genus-lilium.com/bulb.htmFurther information on both scale and seed propagation is at –http://www.pwk.resteddoginn.ca/produce.php

In the sunny borders of my garden, mature stands of Lilium superbum, or “Turk’s Cap Lily” as it’s commonly known, have reached heights of 6 feet and higher.

They also make wonderfully attractive, long lasting cut flowers and a mature planting can yield well over 100 flowers over a long bloom period during mid summer.

 

I wish I could tell you that the deer don’t like Lilium superbum, but that would be a lie as they love them. But if you want an easy to grow plant that will deliver beautiful cut flowers for all the vases in your house, you owe it to yourself to grow this plant out of Bambi’s reach.

I’ve been building a good stock of Lilium superbum to share with you and if your ground is still frozen, not to worry, as you can specify the shipdate for your particular area in a provided space on our online PDF orderform or pot them up now and keep them on a windowsill until you’re ready to plant them out.

What you’ll receive are large, 5-7 year old bareroot blooming size bulbs. They’ll arrive wrapped in long fibered, unmilled sphagnum moss. This material is antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral and a very useful material.

The prices shown below include FREE SHIPPINGon bareroot plants out of their 2″ pots. If you would like to receive the plants undisturbed, in their pots, please add .95¢ per plant to cover the extra cost of shipping soil and pots.

3   for $ 25.00  delivered (that's $8.35 ea)
7   for $ 50.00  delivered (that's $7.15 ea)
12  for $ 75.00  delivered (that's $6.25 ea)
20  for $100.00  delivered (that's $5.00 ea)

Larger quantities at even lower prices upon request.

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just fill out the order form at http://www.sunfarm.com/orderform.pdf

 

 

 

Maianthemum canadense
Good morning, children. It’s time for todays Latin lesson.

Well actually, although most botanical nomenclature is in the beautiful language of Latin, there is much in Greek and other languages. So to be correct, we should refer to a plant name as its “Scientific Name”.

The flavor of the day today is Maianthemum canadense, a plant that rocks my world every spring. If you break down the genus name, “Mai” refers to the month of May, (duh), the time that this woodland beauty flowers with its soft sprays of creamy white flowers and, of course, “anthemum” means flower. So there ya go, and that brings us to its common names, “May Flower”, “Canada Mayflower” and “False Lily of the Valley”. Common names can be so charming, don’t you agree?

By the way, although the specific epithet is canadense, that doesn’t mean it is native only to Canada. During the time ofCarl Linnaeus, the father of modern taxonomy,  1707-1778, there was no United States and this whole part of the world was referred to as Canada. Consequently, plants like Asarum canadenseAquilegia canadense etc were given the specific epithet of canadense to describe the region of the world that they inhabited.

Although Maianthemum canadense is native to 27 mostly northern states and every province of Canada, seehttp://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=MACA4Maianthemum canadense also grows well in the south and west if provided full shade. Soooooo I guess that justa bout covers every state in the mainland US and I’d venture to say they’d probably grow well in Alaska also. Hawaii ??, I don’t know.

Maianthemum canadense is one of my all-time favorite native groundcovers. It forms a dense mat of glossy green foliage that emerges through the leaf litter in my garden very early in the spring. Even after the long flowering period, the foliage is persistent the growing season long. Maianthemum canadense spreads by underground runners (stolons) to quickly form a natural colony. I would never consider it invasive or even aggressive.

 

I have some lovely plants of Maianthemum canadense that I’d love to share with you. They’re single leaved plants, bareroot with a nice stolon and root. And next year, you’ll have two or three and the following year, more and the following year,  even more, and…well…you get it. They’re very easy to establish bareroot anytime of the year that the ground isn’t frozen. Just keep them moist, not wet, until they get established.

Ohhhhhh, I almost forgot to tell you, and in case you were wondering, the deer have NEVER touched them! And I live 10 miles down a one lane road on a 3000′ mountain in a town of 18 people where the deer outnumber the humans 3-1. And neither have the rabbits or other little varmints. By the way, did you know that was the correct spelling of the word that I always thought was “varmits”???

The prices shown below include FREE SHIPPING on bareroot plants out of their 2″ pots. If you would like to receive the plants undisturbed, in their pots, please add .95¢ per plant to cover the extra cost of shipping soil and pots.

12    are $25.00  delivered ($2.09 ea)
30    are $50.00  delivered ($1.67 ea)
50    are $75.00  delivered ($1.50 ea)
100  are $100.00 delivered ($1.00 ea)

Larger quantities at even lower prices upon request

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just fill out the order form athttp://www.sunfarm.com/orderform.pdf

Most of our previous weekly specials are still available. Go to –http://sunfarm.com/specials/ to browse the archives.

Meehania cordata
When Thomas Meehan, a Philadelphia Botanist, died in 1901, I’m sure he went to the big forest in the sky feeling proud that Nathaniel Lord Britton (1859-1934), named a genus of plants in his honor. I’d also bet that he didn’t now how wonderful his namesake plant was.

In fact, most people don’t know how wonderful Meehania cordata is.

My dear friends Charles and Martha Oliver are the proprietors of the Primrose Path Nursery in Scottdale PA. I’d noticed Meehania cordata listed in their catalog and after reading their description and hearing them extol the virtues about how charming this little plant was, I asked them to please bring me one on their upcoming visit. I had requested one the year before, but it always seemed they were sold out. I was emphatic that I must have one, and intimated should they not bring me one, they may end up sleeping in my barn that chilly Autumn night.

Tiarella, Heuchera and Heucherella are the main focus of their breeding program, so we had planned a day of Tiarella hunting in Wolfpen Hollow, a hauntingly mysterious woodland area near my farm. We’d just descended from a summit into the foggy creekbottom when I heard Charles laughing hysterically behind me on the trail. I turned to see what he found so amusing and saw him pointing to the ground. There, all around him, the ground was covered with “Meehans Mint”.

Talk about getting caught not “practicing what you preach”. I, who in all of my lectures on native plants, makes a point of telling people to “look in your own backyard!” Well… after I recovered from my initial embarrassment, we looked further and found the entire West facing slope of the hill down to the creekbed was a veritable carpet of dark, glossy green, cordate, ( heart shaped, hence the specific epithet cordata) leaves. They were vining over rocks and decaying tree limbs, basking in the deep shade of the hemlock and oak woods above the water.

I took some cuttings, not knowing whether they would root so late in the season but I had a gut feeling of optimism. Sure enough, they rooted in a matter of weeks.

The following Spring, I checked in on the population and found that the new growth was thick and lovely. In June, I went back to observe the flowers and found a sea of lilac, pink and lavender trumpet like blooms at the tips of the stems. They reminded me very much of Scutellaria, another member of the mint family and close relative of Meehania.

In my garden, I now having many plants from the rooted cuttings that I overwintered under a dark bench in a greenhouse. This is another testament to the virtues of Meehania is how deep a shade it thrives in. I proceeded to plant them under a small grove of Lilacs and Viburnums and they responded to the rich humus that had accumulated under these older shrubs. Almost immediately started to wind their way around on the ground. Unlike most members of the mint family, Meehania cordata is NOT invasive or aggressive.

Taxonomically speaking, Meehania cordata is a member of the Lamiaceae (Mint) family. In North America Meehania cordata is a monotypic (single) species in the genus. Its reported range is from SW PA to NC and TN. Its heart shaped leaves are on the small side, averaging 1-1 1/2 ” wide at the petiole and are about 1″ long. I suspect that it is hardy to zone 4, maybe even 3.

I know of at least one other Meehania species in cultivation, that being Meehania urticifolia, Meehania cordata‘s Asian cousin. It can be found growing through the woods of the mountain forests in the Honshu area of Japan. The specific epithet urticifolia refers to the nettle like foliage.

It’s also very easy to propagate from stem cuttings and by division.

Meehania cordata is one of the best plants I can think of for those dark and foreboding corners of the garden where there isn’t enough light for most other plants. Even if it didn’t have the added benefit of the bright colorful flowers, I would recommend it as a very useful groundcover.

I’ve been selling Meehania cordata in 2″ treeband ® pots for $7.50 ea plus $9.00 for UPS. Over the last few years, we’ve really put some effort into building a large stock so as to be able to reduce the price and I’m pleased to tell you that we have succeeded. The prices shown below include FREE SHIPPING on bareroot plants out of their 2″ pots. If you would like to receive the plants undisturbed, in their pots, please add .95¢ per plant to cover the extra cost of shipping soil and pots.

7 for $ 35.00 delivered ($5.00 ea)
10 for $ 45.00 delivered ($4.50 ea)
15 for $ 60.00 delivered ($4.00 ea)
20 for $ 70.00 delivered ($3.50 ea)
50 for $150.00 delivered ($3.00 ea)

 

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just download and print our order form and send it along with your check to:

Internet Order Department
Sunshine Farm & Gardens
HC 67 Box 539 B
Renick WV 24966 USA

Mertensia virginica
America’s favorite wildflower is sound asleep right now, tucked in under a lovely white blanket of snow, my favorite mulch. But before you know it, the snow will melt, the ground will warm and tight little purplish-green buds of Mertensia virginica will be pushing their way up towards the heavens. These buds gently unfold into 12″ – 24″ medium green stems over the following week or two and reveal clusters of pinkish-blue, pendulous flower buds that burst open into the softest, pastel blue flowers. As the flowers age, they ever so slowly and magically turn a subtle shade of light pink.

Please don’t let the common name mislead you, “Virginia Bluebells” are native to just about the entire eastern half of the US and Canada – http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=MEVI3 and there are 18 different species in the US alone – http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=MERTEMertensia virginica being the most widely cultivated of the lot. These early Spring wildflowers will grow happily just about everywhere in the world.

Mertensia virginica is a member of the Boraginaceae (Borage) family, and shares residence in that family with other popular genera such as Pulmonaria, Omphalodes, Symphytum, Myosotis, etc. The genus name Mertensia is in honor of the German botanist Franz Karl Mertens (1764-1831).

 

Now, while they are still dormant and as soon as your ground thaws is a very good time to plant Mertensia virginica to ensure that you will get a good bloom this Spring. Mertensia virginica is one of our earliest and easiest to grow Spring ephemeral wildflowers. Eventually we must part company with this lovely plant but not until it sets a respectable enough quantity of seeds to assure that you will soon have a colony. It will then fade away and fall back into a deep slumber until next Spring. I highly recommend Polystichum acrostichoides as a companion plant. Universally known as the “Christmas Fern”, this versatile evergreen fern benefits from a haircut in early Spring, just before the emergence of the Mertensia. As the Mertensia is “bidding ado”, the P olystichum acrostichoideswill be unfurling its new fronds and will quickly cover any bare spots left behind by the Mertensia.

See……..there’s no need to hire a professional garden designer, as good gardening is little more than common sense and observation, not “rocket science” or “brain surgery”.

And, as if Mertensia virginica didn’t have enough gold star attributes, it’s NOT on Bambi’s menu.

I’ve been building a good stock of Mertensia virginica to share with you and if your ground is still frozen, not to worry, as you can specify the shipdate for your particular area in a provided space on our online PDF orderform.

What you’ll receive are large, 5 year old bareroot blooming size tubers, actually, they look like miniature carrots. They’ll arrive wrapped in long fibered, unmilled sphagnum moss. This material is antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral and a very useful material.

The prices shown below include FREE SHIPPING on bareroot plants out of their 2″ pots. If you would like to receive the plants undisturbed, in their pots, please add .95¢ per plant to cover the extra cost of shipping soil and pots.

7   for $ 35.00  delivered ($5.00 ea)
10  for $ 45.00  delivered ($4.50 ea)
15  for $ 60.00  delivered ($4.00 ea)
20  for $ 70.00  delivered ($3.50 ea)
50  for $150.00  delivered ($3.00 ea)

Larger quantities at even lower prices upon request.

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just fill out the order form at http://www.sunfarm.com/orderform.pdf

Mitchella repens
And a partridge in a pear tree…

Forgive me for borrowing a line from that little ditty that some wily Jesuit priests penned in the 16th centurybut I couldn’t think of a more clever way to introduce you to Mitchella repens, aka “Partridge Berry”. Yes, it’s only the middle of November, not even Thanksgiving yet, but already my local Walmart has rolled out the Christmas decorations.

Mitchella repens has opposite, evergreen, glossy, oval to heart-shaped leaves, 1/2 inch across, with parallel veining in the midrib and carpets the ground with its 12″ – 18″ vines. The bright red berries are edible, but nowhere near as tasty as Gaultheria procumbens (Teaberry), and persist all winter unless the partridges, grouse, fox or other wildlife discover them.

Native to 35 states and 3 provinces of Canada east of the Mississippi – http://plants.usda.gov/java/nameSearch?keywordquery=mitchella+repens&mode=sciname this extremely useful groundcover is rarely seen in the trade. I fail to see why, as it’s very easy to propagate by rooting cuttings or from seed. In fact, it forms adventitious roots as it gently winds its way around the garden. It could never, by any stretch of the imagination, be considered aggressive or invasive.

And guess what else! I just happened to have a pot at eye level and discovered that the pink to pure white, tubular flowers that occur in pairs from June to July are really very fragrant. Here’s a closeup of the flowers –http://www.missouriplants.com/Whiteopp/Mitchella_repens_page.html and another at http://www.ct-botanical-society.org/galleries/mitchellarepe.html As I said, the flowers occur in pairs and after fertilization, the two flower ovaries fuse together, giving rise to a single red fruit. The two dimples on the fruit reveal its fused nature.

As strange as it may seem, the genus Mitchella is in the Rubiaceae (Madder) family, the same family as Coffee arabica. Yes, that’s the same coffee we get at Starbucks!

Native American women often drank a tea made from the leaves of this plant as an aid in childbirth.

I use Mitchella repens as a native alternative to that nasty Vinca that I’ve been trying to rid myself of for over 30 years.

It seems to tolerate dry soils although in its natural habitats, it’s usually found in rich, moist, acidic woods.

 

I can’t say that Mitchella repens is “completely” deerproof, however, it does seem that Bambi is more fond of the berries than the foliage and frequently seems to beat the birds to the bounty, while not intentionally disturbing the plant.

Over the last few years, I’ve been building a good stock of this glorious groundcover to share with you, and if now isn’t the correct time to plant in your area, you can still reserve them for a later ship date by specifying that in a space provided on our order form. Please circle the ship date in red crayon so I don’t miss it.

What you’ll receive are full 2″ pots, each with 3-5 rooted vines growing in them.

The prices shown below include FREE SHIPPING on bareroot plants out of their 2″ pots. If you would like to receive the plants undisturbed, in their pots, please add .95¢ per plant to cover the extra cost of shipping soil and pots.

4   for $ 25.00  delivered ($6.25 ea)
9   for $ 50.00  delivered ($5.50 ea)
15  for $ 75.00  delivered ($5.00 ea)
25  for $100.00  delivered ($4.00 ea)

Larger quantities at even lower prices upon request.

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just fill out the order form at http://www.sunfarm.com/orderform.pdf

Ophiopogon planiscapus nigrescens
Black is Beautiful. No, that statement has no connection with the Black Pride movement of the 60’s, but it epitomizes how I feel about Ophiopogon planiscapus nigrescens, one of the most unusual little plants I’ve ever grown and quite a mouthful to pronounce.

Often referred to as “Black Mondo Grass”, this cool little plant is actually a member of the Lily family and not a grass at all. I’ve been growing it for over 15 years now here in zone 5, although many of the books say it’s hardy only to zone 7. It’s a good thing that the plants can’t read the books. If you have any doubts about Ophiopogon planiscapus nigrescens surviving in your area, keep it inside on a windowsill for the first year. Not only will it make a great houseplant, but your “Black Mondo” will produce a plethora of offsets in the pot and you’ll have a large clump to plant the following Spring.

It is sexy, silky, sultry, smooth, shiny and simply sensational to use in combination with lighter colored foliage.  I first saw Ophiopogon planiscapus nigrescens in the garden of Beth Chatto in England in the early 90’s. She had it planted among some blueish Hostas and it gave me the idea to plant it among some golden Lysimachia nummularia ‘aurea’. As you can see below, the black color is really highlighted by the gold. There are numerous companion plants that can play off the black color and I’m sure you’ll come up with some brilliant combinations of your own.

 

I’ve been selling Ophiopogon planiscapus nigrescens in 2″ treeband ® pots for $10.00 ea plus $9.00 for UPS. Over the last few years, we’ve really put some effort into building a large stock so as to be able to reduce the price and I’m pleased to tell you that we have succeeded. The prices shown below include FREE SHIPPING on bareroot plants out of their 2″ pots. If you would like to receive the plants undisturbed, in their pots, please add .95¢ per plant to cover the extra cost of shipping soil and pots.

3   for $ 25.00  delivered ($8.35 ea)
7   for $ 50.00  delivered ($7.15 ea)
12  for $ 75.00  delivered ($6.25 ea)
20  for $100.00  delivered ($5.00 ea)

I look forward to sharing these valuable, useful and unusual plants with you.

 

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just download and print our order form and send it along with your check to:

Internet Order Department
Sunshine Farm & Gardens
HC 67 Box 539 B
Renick WV 24966 USA

Osmunda claytoniana
My Very Favorite Fern.

I love all ferns, but pressed to come up with a favorite, I’d have to say that it’s Osmunda claytoniana, the “Interrupted Fern”. This extremely easy to grow native fern makes up one third of the US Osmunda family. The other two relatives are Osmunda regalis, the “Royal Fern” and Osmunda cinnamomea, the “Cinnamon Fern”, but more about those cousins later. Now at this point you’re probably wondering about the common name, “Interrupted Fern”, aren’t you? Well, to explain that moniker visually, I’ve included a second image below that illustrates the very unusual means that this fern has evolved with to produce its spores. On a mature plant, the vegetative fronds commence growth in early Spring and then abruptly stop. At this juncture, fertile spores are produced and then vegetative growth restarts. Quite an unusual reproductive system, I must say. As far as I know, this habit is unique to this species alone.

Osmunda claytoniana is easily grown in medium to moist, even wet soils in part shade to full shade. In its native habitats, it usually is found in moist, rich, humusy, acidic soils, but happily adapts to much lesser conditions.

The plants in the images below are growing along a rock wall in my garden and have been in place about 10 years. A few years ago, a mature apple tree succumbed to ferocious Winter winds and blew over exposing the ferns to full, hot afternoon sun. They’ve adapted quite well and are now over 5 feet tall.

Their impressive stature is a welcome addition to every type of garden whether it’s a mixed perennial border, a wild native or woodland garden or even in a formal setting.

Besides spores, they reproduce by offsets, but very slowly and never aggressively.

In all my 30 + years of growing this magnificent fern, I’ve never seen a deer or any other varmint bother with it. I’ve also never encountered any other insect, pest or disease problems.

 

There is quite an abundance of Osmunda claytoniana here now for me to share with you, and I promise that you will enjoy growing them and treasure their presence in your garden as much as I do them in mine.

What I’ll be sending you are very large, 5 year old bareroot plants in active growth. They’ll arrive on your doorstep with their roots wrapped in long fibered, unmilled sphagnum moss. This biodegradable material is antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral and a very useful material.

The prices shown below include FREE SHIPPING on bareroot plants out of their 2″ pots. If you would like to receive the plants undisturbed, in their pots, please add .95¢ per plant to cover the extra cost of shipping soil and pots.

4   for $ 25.00  delivered ($6.25 ea)
9   for $ 50.00  delivered ($5.50 ea)
15  for $ 75.00  delivered ($5.00 ea)
25  for $100.00  delivered ($4.00 ea)

Larger quantities at even lower prices upon request

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just fill out the order form at http://www.sunfarm.com/orderform.pdf

Pachysandra procumbens
In most cases, I’ve discovered the Asian counterpart of our native plants to be much showier, more robust and, in many instances, more floriferous than our native species. Take Claytonia for example. Our native Claytonia virginica and Claytonia caroliniana are very early, beautiful little plants. However, although their flowers are lovely, they’re very small and the entire plant is extremely ephemeral. On the other hand, Claytonia Sibirica has thicker, more deeply veined foliage and it flowers for months.

One major exception to this rule is Pachysandra procumbens. It’s an East Coast member of the Buxaceae (Boxwood) family and is commonly referred to as “Allegheny Spurge”. This plant is superior to the more commonly used (Asian) Pachysandra terminalis in virtually every respect.

The Asian Pachysandra terminalis is a very aggressive, stoloniferous thug in the garden. And, although this can be a benefit if you want to fill in a very large area, super fast, its well behaved American cousin, P. procumbens, is a clump forming groundcover that fills in an area slowly, however much more elegantly.

Pachysandra procumbens is hardy in most areas of the US, probably into zone 4, maybe even 3. In zones 7-10 or during mild Winters elsewhere, it stays evergreen. In colder areas it will be a herbaceous perennial.

In the early Spring, P.p. shoots up very cool spikes of pink and white fragrant flowers that last for a week or two. Soon after the flowers have set seed, the first vegetative shoots poke their heads through the soil and their dark green leaves begin to unfold. In deep shade, the foliage remains a dark, luxurious, green all summer. The more sun that the plants get, the lighter their leaves are. I planted a row in full sun as an experiment to test the plant’s extremes. The plants in the sun were healthy and productive but the leaves were paler in color, some with an almost chloritic appearance. This is definitely a dappled to deep shade plant!

In the late summer to early fall, Pachysandra procumbens reminds us of the approaching Autumnal Equinox by “opening its windows to let in more light”. This effect takes its form as beautiful silvery mottling on the leaves that I can only compare to snowflakes in the respect that no two leaves are alike. Oh! The joy of jumping around on the ground like a frog from plant to plant, trying to select the most striking patterns. In the end, they’re all brilliant and unique.

Pachysandra procumbens is a very easy, but slow plant to propagate. You can take stem/leaf cuttings in the early spring, but rhizome divisions are quicker and easier. On a mature rhizome, there many “joints”. If you make a complete cut at each joint, leaving the plant above it with a few good roots intact, you will have several 2″-4″ pieces that you can pot up or lay out in a flat and cover with about a 1/2″ of soil. Root pieces taken in the early spring, while the plants are still dormant, will produce new plants ready for planting the same season.

All in all, it’s difficult to find a better, all around, more useful, adaptable ground cover plant than Pachysandra procumbens.

I’ve been sharing my limited stock of Pachysandra procumbens as bareroot 5 year old plants for $7.50 ea plus shipping. Over the last few years, I’ve really put some effort into building a large quantity so as to be able to reduce the price and I’m pleased to tell you that I’ve succeeded. The prices shown below include FREE SHIPPING on bareroot plants out of their 2″ pots. If you would like to receive the plants undisturbed, in their pots, please add .95¢ per plant to cover the extra cost of shipping soil and pots.

7 for $ 35.00 ($5.00 ea)
10 for $ 45.00 ($4.50 ea)
15 for $ 60.00 ($4.00 ea)
20 for $ 70.00 ($3.50 ea)
50 for $150.00 ($3.00 ea)

 

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just download and print our order form and send it along with your check to:

Internet Order Department
Sunshine Farm & Gardens
HC 67 Box 539 B
Renick WV 24966 USA

Pediomelum subacaule
Let’s face it, for some mysterious, pre-programmed, genetically imprinted reason, as a species, we gardeners are always on the hunt for those elusive blue flowers. Well……… whilst I can’t tempt you with a blue Hellebore or a blue Daylily, I have something for you that will fill the bill in the meantime. Here’s a plant that I’ll wager, you don’t already grow and is a plant you’ve never even heard of. Not only that, you shan’t find it elsewhere, as I’m the only fellow on the planet, maybe even in the entire universe, that has it in production.

Don’t ask me why, because it’s one of the easiest plants I’ve ever grown, takes full blistering sun, is perennial and long lived, has no insect pest or disease problems, is not invasive or aggressive and looks good all the growing season long, even when it’s not in flower. And……….it’s THAT blue blue blue.

Maybe it’s because of the name, a multi-syllabic tongue twister of a name, but one that after you’ve heard yourself speak it a few times, begins to roll gently off your lips and will impress your friends as it sounds so very scientific.

And the name is, drum roll please, Pediomelum subacaule!!!

Now if that ‘s a bit much for you to orate, then just say “Nashville Breadroot”. The logic behind the common name derives from their starchy, tuber-like roots which can be eaten like tuberous vegetables such as potatoes or made into flour as the early Native Americans did.

My initial acquaintance with this delightful plant happened quite accidentally when I serendipitously obtained seeds from a NARGS seed exchange mislabeled Lupinus perennis and happily grew the resulting plants for years and years. That was… until a visitor to my garden enlightened me to its true identity as she gazed excitedly at a plant that she’d only seen in pictures. As fate would have it, her observation was 100% correct and it truly is Pediomelum subacaule.

The ideal location in your garden would be the very front of a sunny border as the height is rarely over 6″ – 8″ tall, slightly taller when in flower. In my garden, I have them interplanted with Hypoxis hirsuta and the yellow and blue combo is absof*****glutely stunning.

Hardiness has never been an issue either. In the ground they’ve scoffed at below zero temps without a blanket of the white stuff or even a decent mulch. I’ve also left them in pots, unprotected all Winter and they’ve easily handled 9 degrees with no snow cover. Neither is heat tolerance a problem, as I have friends in Austin TX growing them now for several years and if you know anything about Austin besides the great music scene, believe me the heat is brutal.

You can see more images herehere and a rare white form here.

Can you think of any reason why you shouldn’t be growing this plant??? (I didn’t think so…)

I’ve plenty of 5 year old, flowering size plants to share with you.

The prices shown below include FREE SHIPPING on bare root plants

7   for $ 35.00  delivered ($5.00 ea)
10  for $ 45.00  delivered ($4.50 ea)
15  for $ 60.00  delivered ($4.00 ea)
20  for $ 70.00  delivered ($3.50 ea)
50  for $150.00  delivered ($3.00 ea)

Larger quantities at even lower prices upon request.

By the way, I also have a limited quantity of 9 year old plants established in 5″ deep pots, if you are interested in those plants, let me know.

 

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just download and print our order form and send it along with your check to:

Internet Order Department
Sunshine Farm & Gardens
HC 67 Box 539 B
Renick WV 24966 USA

Phlox paniculata 'Jeana'
I HATE Phlox paniculata, I LOVE Phlox paniculata, HATE Phlox paniculata, I LOVE Phlox paniculata, HATE Phlox paniculata, I LOVE Phlox paniculata, HATE Phlox paniculata, I LOVE Phlox paniculata!!!

I guess you could say that I have a Love/Hate relationship with Phlox paniculata . That was until my friend, Jeana Pruitt emerged from a colony of over 100,000 Phlox paniculata near her home in Nashville TN with one plant that she deemed to be radically different than all the rest. And… after growing her Phlox for over 10 years, this skeptical, yet optimistic gardener is unequivocally convinced that this is the best selection of Phlox paniculata EVER!!!

Phlox paniculata ‘Jeana’ is a vigorous grower, yet it never attains heights over 24″, about half the size of the straight species. Instead of 15-25 flowers per panicle, it can have up to 100 long lasting, fragrant, lavender/pink flowers that open slowly over a long period and stay vibrant for quite a while during mid Summer through early Autumn.

The most exciting attribute of this garden gem is the fact that in over 10 years, through all different seasonal and weather conditions, Phlox paniculata ‘Jeana’ has NEVER shown ANY signs of Powdery Mildew, a disease that disfigures EVERY other Phlox paniculata that I’ve ever grown!

Here’s a comparison that I photographed last Summer between Phlox paniculata ‘Jeana’, Phlox paniculata ‘David’ and Phlox paniculata ‘Fuji’, the two plants touted as the most Powdery Mildewresistant cultivars to date. As you can see, both of the other plants are entirely covered in the disease and Phlox paniculata ‘Jeana’ is perfectly clean. The images speak for themselves!!! Phlox paniculata ‘Jeana’ is hardy from zones 3 – 8 and seems to grow well in full sun to full shade in average to moist soils.

I’ve been building a good stock of plants to share with you and now is the PERFECT time to plant them.

What you’ll receive are 2 year old bareroot plants in active growth that have flowered for the last 2 years. They’re ready to plant for a spectacular bloom next Summer. They’ll arrive on your doorstep with their roots wrapped in long fibered, unmilled sphagnum moss. This biodegradable material is antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral and a very useful material.

If you’re squeamish about bareroot plants or are not ready to plant and would like plants established in 2″ pots, please add an extra $5.00 to your total order to cover the extra packing and shipping charges.

The prices shown below include FREE SHIPPING on bareroot plants out of their 2″ pots. If you would like to receive the plants undisturbed, in their pots, please add .95¢ per plant to cover the extra cost of shipping soil and pots.

7   for $ 35.00  delivered ($5.00 ea)
10  for $ 45.00  delivered ($4.50 ea)
15  for $ 60.00  delivered ($4.00 ea)
20  for $ 70.00  delivered ($3.50 ea)
50  for $150.00  delivered ($3.00 ea)

Larger quantities at even lower prices upon request

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just fill out the order form at http://www.sunfarm.com/orderform.pdf

Phlox stolonifera
Phlox stolonifera carpets the earth in a particularly colorless area in my shade borders. During the several weeks that it’s in bloom, the brilliant clouds of magenta light up the woods. In the wild, her flower color can be very variable, from white to a light violet blue to a deep cerise and every shade in betwixt and between. My chosen selection (shown) falls somewhere in the middle of that grand color scheme. There are also several named cultivars.

Phlox stolonifera is native to 12 states in the Eastern US – primarily in the Appalachian Mountains.

And Phlox stolonifera is one of the most reliable, attractive and utilitarian groundcovers you can use in your garden in a plethora of settings and conditions. The specific epithet (the second word in a scientific plant name, which usually describes a trait of that plant) refers to the fact that it produces stolons. Stolons are similar to normal stems except they produce adventitious roots and normally run horizontally to the soil surface, instead of up into the air. They also have long internodes with reduced leaves. Plants with stolons are referred to as stoloniferous and root along the ground as they grow. I’ve successfully grown this plant in deep shade and in full sun, and it doesn’t appear to have any particular soil type preference either. How much easier could a plant get!

I somewhat hesitate to saddle Phlox stolonifera with the moniker of “groundcover”, as that distinction may limit its imaginative use in a wider variety of situations. It certainly looks great as an accent plant and as a medium height edging plant. Hardiness range is USDA zones 4-9 and my best guess would push that a zone in each direction. In foliage, the height is about 6″ tall, add another 6″ when in flower.

 

I don’t like to clutter my emails with too many images and I decided to use a closeup of Phlox stolonifera here. I’d like you to see how great it looks in a garden setting, so I’ve chose a few images for you to look at. Here’s one in one a backyard garden growing with Cypripedium calceolus and Trillium grandiflorum – http://www.npsnj.org/images/c_calceolus_2.jpg Magnar Aspaker even grows Phlox stolonifera in his garden in Norwayhttp://magnar.aspaker.no/Phlox%20stolonifera.jpg

So there you have it, a great plant that will grow well in just about any garden in any just about any locale.

I’ve a good stock of flowering age plants in 2″ pots that are ready to take flight in your garden and I’ve saved some for you. Check out the very reasonable prices below.

The prices shown below include FREE SHIPPING on bareroot plants out of their 2″ pots. If you would like to receive the plants undisturbed, in their pots, please add .95¢ per plant to cover the extra cost of shipping soil and pots.

7   for $ 35.00  delivered ($5.00 ea)
10  for $ 45.00  delivered ($4.50 ea)
15  for $ 60.00  delivered ($4.00 ea)
20  for $ 70.00  delivered ($3.50 ea)
50  for $150.00  delivered ($3.00 ea)
Larger quantities at even lower prices upon request

 

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just download and print our order form and send it with your check to: Internet Order Department
Sunshine Farm & Gardens
HC 67 Box 539 B
Renick WV 24966 USA

Polypodium virginianum
I was strolling through the woodland areas of my nursery the other day when I noticed how nicely the Polypodiums had tucked themselves in for the Winter. They had nestled themselves under a cozy blanket of fallen leaves from the Oaks and Maples that had shaded them during the growing season. I then came to the realization that I’ve been neglectful in sharing this very charming, little evergreen fern with you. Please accept my sincere, heartfelt apology for that selfish indiscretion and read on.

Polypodium virginianum aka the “Rock Polypody” is native to just about every state east of the Mississippi, Alaska, almost every province in Canada and all the way north up to Greenland and Iceland – http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=POVI7

The name for the genus comes from the Greek, polus, “many” and podos, “foot”, “many footed”. There are about 75-100 species in the genus, mostly tropical, believe it or not. There are both terrestrial and epiphytic species in the genus. If you’ve ever travelled to Charleston SC, you may have visited the Angel Oak, a 1500 year old Quercus virginiana. This “Live Oak” is covered with the epiphytic species, Polypodium polypodioides, the “Resurrection Fern” – http://www.majestyoftrees.com/the-angel-oak Many other trees in the Southern US are covered with this epiphytic species.

But back to this species, Polypodium virginianum. To grow it requires no master’s degree in gardening or landscape architecture or any particularly colored thumb. It’s really quite simple! Just give it some average to moist shade and don’t bury the roots too deeply into the soil. In my gardens and in the naturally occurring colonies on my farm, it sprawls itself over sandstone boulders in a very thin layer of soil and organic debris. Drought tolerance is another merit, as it easily survived over 6 weeks with no rain this Summer and didn’t bat an eye.

I was strolling through the woodland areas of my nursery the other day when I noticed how nicely the Polypodiums had tucked themselves in for the Winter. They had nestled themselves under a cozy blanket of fallen leaves from the Oaks and Maples that had shaded them during the growing season. I then came to the realization that I’ve been neglectful in sharing this very charming, little evergreen fern with you. Please accept my sincere, heartfelt apology for that selfish indiscretion and read on.

Polypodium virginianum aka the “Rock Polypody” is native to just about every state east of the Mississippi, Alaska, almost every province in Canada and all the way north up to Greenland and Iceland – http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=POVI7

The name for the genus comes from the Greek, polus, “many” and podos, “foot”, “many footed”. There are about 75-100 species in the genus, mostly tropical, believe it or not. There are both terrestrial and epiphytic species in the genus. If you’ve ever travelled to Charleston SC, you may have visited the Angel Oak, a 1500 year old Quercus virginiana. This “Live Oak” is covered with the epiphytic species, Polypodium polypodioides, the “Resurrection Fern” – http://www.majestyoftrees.com/the-angel-oak Many other trees in the Southern US are covered with this epiphytic species.

But back to this species, Polypodium virginianum. To grow it requires no master’s degree in gardening or landscape architecture or any particularly colored thumb. It’s really quite simple! Just give it some average to moist shade and don’t bury the roots too deeply into the soil. In my gardens and in the naturally occurring colonies on my farm, it sprawls itself over sandstone boulders in a very thin layer of soil and organic debris. Drought tolerance is another merit, as it easily survived over 6 weeks with no rain this Summer and didn’t bat an eye.

Polystichum acrostichoides
It’s time that you heard more about what is most likely the most indestructible fern in the world, the “Christmas Fern”. Known in Latin circles as Polystichum acrostichoides, here’s an evergreen native fern that can take almost anything you can throw at it. This is a native fern that can be found growing naturally in every state east of the Rocky Mountains.

I’ll share what my buddy, Dr. Gerald Klingaman of the University of Arkansas has to say about this durable plant:

“The association with Christmas is an old one, for the fronds were once harvested by the tons, baled into bundles and sold to florists for wreath making. We no longer rely on evergreen ferns for wreaths. Now we’ve got plastic!

The Christmas fern grows to about 18 inches tall and wide with all of the fronds emerging from a central crown. As the plant ages, it produces more fronds, but the usual number is about 20 on the typical plant. Given good growing conditions, plants produce many more fronds than you’ll see in the wild. The base of the frond and the central crown is covered with brown scales.

The fronds are pinnately compound, meaning there is a central axis with the individual leaflets (pinnae in fern lingo), produced at right angles down its length. The pinnae are to 2 inches long, but get proportionally smaller as you move down the midrib. Typical pinnae have a thumb-like lobe at the top, giving it a mitten-like appearance. Some see a Christmas stocking in outline, but they are wrong. It’s a mitten.

About two-thirds of the way down the length of the frond, the pinnae get abruptly smaller. These are the spore-bearing pinnae that, on the under surface, have two rows of spore dots down their length. Under magnification these sori – the name used by fern experts – produce a number of curled, snail-like cases.

While Christmas Ferns are evergreen, their fronds are not immortal. In early spring, just as new fronds begin to uncurl, the old fronds wither away. They’ll always look GREAT in your garden.

There are several other reasons that Polystichum acrostichoides has ended up with the common name of “Christmas Fern”. One of them is because of its evergreen nature. But my two favorite reasons, and I never miss an opportunity to demonstrate to folks on hikes that I lead, are that when you pull off a single leaflet (pinnae) and hold it horizontally,  it looks like Santa standing up on the back of his sled and if you hold it vertically, it resembles a Christmas stocking or what Dr Klingaman envisions as a mitten.

These long lived plants are so tough that you can transplant them almost any time that the ground isn’t frozen! They’re also hardy from zones 3 – 10. They prefer light to full shade, although in most northern states can take a lot of sun. The richer the soil, the larger they grow, but I’ve seen them quite happy in dry, shaley, poor soil.

What I’m offering you here are 5 year old, huge plants, not our usual 2″ pots. They’re shipped bareroot and are very easy to establish.

The prices shown below include FREE SHIPPING on bareroot plants out of their 2″ pots. If you would like to receive the plants undisturbed, in their pots, please add .95¢ per plant to cover the extra cost of shipping soil and pots.

7   for $ 35.00  delivered ($5.00 ea)
10  for $ 45.00  delivered ($4.50 ea)
15  for $ 60.00  delivered ($4.00 ea)
20  for $ 70.00  delivered ($3.50 ea)
50  for $150.00  delivered ($3.00 ea)
Quotes on larger quantities by request.      

At these reasonable prices, you can afford to naturalize a great drift of evergreen ferns in your garden.   

Ordering couldn't be easier! Just download and print our order form and send it along with your check to:

Internet Order Department
Sunshine Farm & Gardens
HC 67 Box 539 B
Renick WV 24966 USA

Primula japonica
The plant family Primulaceae is home to many genera (plural of the word genus) of plants. The most well known, of course, is the genus Primula, commonly known as “Primroses”. Too many people think of the annual primrose that you buy at Walmart, Primula obconica, when they hear the word Primrose. Truth be told, most Primroses are long-lived perennials. The genus Primula is separated into 18 sections. The plant I’m singing the praises of today, Primula japonica, is in the Proliferae, or “Candelabra” section, so named for its flower form.

This particular species occurs in Japan on moist streambanks in full shade to light sun. Here’s an interesting set of images of a wild population in Japan – http://www.valley.ne.jp/~takagi2/h16-gyouji14.htm

In garden cultivation, plant height is about 6″ – 12″, and in flower, their drumstick like candelabras reach up another 12″ – 24″ with up to 6 rings of extremely long lasting flowers in every imaginable shade of crimson, pink, red, white, lavender, peach, cerise. Oh well, you get the idea! Although each color, if kept isolated, comes true from seed, I tend to appreciate the rainbow mix that happens naturally through their promiscuous nature. And copious amounts of seed they do set! This is a perfect plant to naturalize in your garden. They make a wonderful cut flower and though in nature they do grow in moist to wet areas, I’ve had good success in average soil with a good mulch. I would say they are hardy down to zone 4 and in moist shade can probably handle the heat of zone 9, maybe even 10. As with all Primroses, the deer never bother with them.

The colorful colony pictured below is in a shady section of my garden that has average soil moisture. It started about 5 years ago with just 3 plants.

 

If you would like to learn more about Primroses, I suggest you join the American Primrose Society, they’ve been around since 1949 and publish a full color quarterly journal and have a great seed exchange – http://www.americanprimrosesociety.org/

I’ve a good stock of flowering age plants in 2″ pots that are poised to create a rainbow of color in your garden and I’ve saved some for you. Check out the very reasonable prices below.

The prices shown below include FREE SHIPPING on bareroot plants out of their 2″ pots. If you would like to receive the plants undisturbed, in their pots, please add .95¢ per plant to cover the extra cost of shipping soil and pots.

7   for $ 35.00  delivered ($5.00 ea)
10  for $ 45.00  delivered ($4.50 ea)
15  for $ 60.00  delivered ($4.00 ea)
20  for $ 70.00  delivered ($3.50 ea)
50  for $150.00  delivered ($3.00 ea)

Larger quantities at even lower prices upon request.

I also have a limited stock of older plants available in 5″ deep pots, if you would like the more mature plants, send an email to my personal email address – barry@sunfarm.com and I’ll send you info.

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just download and print our order form, fill out and mail to address listed on the form.

If you don’t have Adobe Acrobat PDF Reader on your computer, you can download it for free at http://www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/readstep2.html

"Ramps"
The “Cat Is Out Of The Bag”! The “Word Is On The Street”! Well….. there are a lot of ways to say it, but you get my drift. I’m referring to the same news that I learned over 42 years ago when, as a young, naive lad, I moved to the mountains of Greenbrier County, West Virginia from the streets of Philadelphia. The local folks were enthralled with us, the “Back To The Land,” “Hippie Homesteaders” influx and were very eager to teach us the ways of the wild. They would take us out into the woods to educate us about edible wild plants like “Rock Lettuce” (Saxifraga micranthidfolia), “Creasy Greens” (Barbarea verna), “Poke Salad” (Phytolacca americana), “Shepherds Purse” (Capsella bursa-pastoris), “Purslane” (Portulaca oleracea) and many other edible wild “weeds”. However, the most cherished and prized edible “native” of all was Allium tricoccum or what they introduced us to as “Ramps”. The word Ramps is a corruption of the old Anglic word “Ramson”, in case you’re wondering how this seemingly strange common name originated.

Now, decades later, it seems that every five star, gourmet restaurant in the US has a “Ramp” dish on the menu.

“Ramps” aka Allium tricoccum, are really wild leeks. They combine the taste of garlic (Allium sativum) with the taste of onion (Allium cepa), although that’s really somewhat of an oversimplification as the taste of “Ramps” is bursting with other so many other flavors and nuances that they leave their actual essence difficult to verbalize. Only your culinary imagination will limit their possibilities in your own kitchen. I use the leaves in salads and stir fries, and chop the bulbs for Miso soup and many other dishes.

 

But besides being delicious, they’re also a highly interesting and desirable landscape plant for the shade garden. They emerge from bare ground in early Spring with very supple medium green foliage and stand about 6″ – 12″ tall. When these leaves disappear, you get 8″ – 12″ sturdy flower stems topped with lovely white flowers. These flowers eventually get pollinated and reveal their very attractive shiny black seeds. “Ramps” are very easy to grow from seed, and the bulbs usually double and form new bulbs that you can pull apart and replant.

Here in WV, “Ramps” are celebrated like saints and holidays. There are many “Ramp Suppers” run by various chambers of commerce and volunteer fire departments etc.

These woodland treasures are becoming so popular that even Martha Stewart put up a page of 15 recipes for cooking with “Ramps”, and here’s another 7 recipes for you. Would you believe that Arianna Huffington has her own “Ramp” recipes. I even found quick and easy directions for making “Ramp Butter”

And if all that weren’t enough, “Ramps” have a huge store of vitamins and minerals, and like garlic and onions, have many nutritional values and medicinal benefits.

“Ramps” are super easy to grow and have no insect, pest or disease problems. All you need is some shade. Of course, the richer and moister your shade is, the better they’ll grow. Very serious, detailed cultivation information and some less detailed, but very relevant cultivation information can be found at these links.

I guess that after all that exciting information about “Ramps”, you’re saying to yourself, “WOW, where can I buy some of these amazing plants”. Well… you’re just a couple clicks away. YES, you can buy “Ramps” right here. I’ve had “Ramps” for sale for several years now and I’ve sold quite a few, but wanted to build up a large stock before doing a mailing. And now the time is right to plant them for a good seed set next year.

What I’ll be sending you are fully dormant, mature, bareroot, seed grown bulbs. They’ll be wrapped gingerly in long fibered, unmilled, moistened sphagnum moss. I’ll include a free plant with seedheads forming on it with each order so you can get a head start on raising your own “Mess O Ramps” from seed this year.

The pricing below includes FREE SHIPPING via Insured Priority Mail.

10  for $ 49.50 delivered ($4.95 ea)
25  for $ 98.75 delivered ($3.95 ea)
50  for $162.50 delivered ($3.25 ea)
75  for $221.25 delivered ($2.95 ea)
100 for $250.00 delivered ($2.50 ea)

 

Larger quantities at even lower prices upon request.

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just fill out the order form at http://www.sunfarm.com/orderform.pdf or download and print our order form and send it along with your check to:

Internet Order Department
Sunshine Farm & Gardens
HC 67 Box 539 B
Renick WV 24966 USA

 

Ruellia humilis
“Wild Petunia” is the common name for a genus of plants in the Acanthaceae family known as Ruellia. The charming plant pictured below is Ruellia humilis, a very easy to grow, native, flowering perennial. It can be found growing wild in exactly half of the states in the US – http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=RUHU The specific epithet “humilis” refers to the low growing habit of the plant. In that respect, I’ve used this colorful, long flowering plant as a ground cover. The deer pay no mind to it, and it can take full sun to full shade quite well. I grow Ruellia in average soil but have trialed it in various conditions and the only habitat this plant seems to object to is wet soil.

And as your eyes tell you from looking at the image, the common name “Wild Petunia” is not a stretch of the imagination as are some common names. These flowers really do resemble the annual Petunias that almost every gardener in the world grows for season long color. But unlike the Petunia, Ruellia humilis is a perennial and returns year after year only to be bigger and more robust.

I hear so many gardeners lamenting that there aren’t enough really exceptional blue plants for their gardens. Well, lament no more! This is that highly desirable, sought after blue. Ruellia humilis seems to be in bloom almost all Spring, Summer and Autumn and has never been touched by insects or any other type of pests in my garden.

The Kemper Center at the Missouri Botanic Garden http://www.mobot.org/gardinghelp/plantfinder/plant.asp?code=M220 lists it as hardy to zone 4.

As I mentioned above, I’ve used this plant as a groundcover both in the garden and on a steep roadbank and have seen other gardeners use it in perennial beds and borders with stunning success.

The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center has a great technical article on Ruellia humilis at:http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=ruhu

 

I’ve been building a good stock of plants to share with you and now is a good time to plant them.

What you’ll receive are large, 2 year old bareroot plants in full, active growth. They’ll come to you wrapped in long fibered, unmilled sphagnum moss. This material is antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral and a very useful material.

The prices shown below include FREE SHIPPING on bareroot plants out of their 2″ pots. If you would like to receive the plants undisturbed, in their pots, please add .95¢ per plant to cover the extra cost of shipping soil and pots.

7   for $ 35.00  delivered ($5.00 ea)
10  for $ 45.00  delivered ($4.50 ea)
15  for $ 60.00  delivered ($4.00 ea)
20  for $ 70.00  delivered ($3.50 ea)
50  for $150.00  delivered ($3.00 ea)

Larger quantities at even lower prices upon request

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just fill out the order form at http://www.sunfarm.com/orderform.pdf

Sanguinaria canadensis
Yes, the common name for our beloved Sanguinaria canadensis is “Bloodroot”. This makes perfect sense as a break in the surface of the plant, especially the roots, reveals a reddish, bloodlike sap. The plant was once used as a dye and for an herbal remedy by early Native Americans. Sanguinaria canadensis is native to every state in the US and to every province of Canada east of the Rockies. Consequently, it’s considered hardy down to Zone 3.

And what an easy plant to grow! It’s best grown in moist, humusy, well-drained soils in part to full shade. It will also do fine with some sun, and seems to grow as well in drier soils. The multiple, pure white blooms atop 6″ – 12″ plants will grace your garden in early Spring and after a couple of years, you’ll have a colony of self sown seedlings around a plant that has grown into a large clump.

The genus Sanguinaria is a member of the Papaveraceae (Poppy) family and is a close relative of plants in the genera Macleaya, Papaver, Meconopsis, Stylophorum, Chelidonium etc.

By the way, Sanguinaria canadensis is 100 % deerproof.

I’ve been building a good stock of plants to share with you and now is the PERFECT time to plant them.

What you’ll receive are 5 year old bareroot rhizomes that have flowered for the last 2 years. They’re ready to plant for a spectacular bloom next Spring. They’ll arrive on your doorstep with their roots wrapped in long fibered, unmilled sphagnum moss. This biodegradable material is antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral and a very useful material.

The prices shown below include FREE SHIPPING on bareroot plants out of their 2″ pots. If you would like to receive the plants undisturbed, in their pots, please add .95¢ per plant to cover the extra cost of shipping soil and pots.

7   for $ 35.00  delivered ($5.00 ea)
10  for $ 45.00  delivered ($4.50 ea)
15  for $ 60.00  delivered ($4.00 ea)
20  for $ 70.00  delivered ($3.50 ea)
50  for $150.00  delivered ($3.00 ea)

Larger quantities at even lower prices upon request

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just fill out the order form at http://www.sunfarm.com/orderform.pdf

Saruma henryi
Seems like the taxonomists that were assigned to name a rare plant discovery from China were either bored, suffered a lack of imagination, were just plain lazy or had a brilliant sense of humor. Whatever the case may be and “A rose by any other yada yada yada”, what we have here is a superb garden plant. I’ve enjoyed Saruma henryi in my garden for about 12 years now and season after season, it never fails to impress all who behold it.

I first saw Saruma henryi growing in Cole Burrell’s ice cold Minnesota zone 4 garden in 1995. I knew if a plant could survive up there, it could survive just about anywhere. Cole, generous chap that he is, was kind enough to send me some seeds and I’ve been growing the plant ever since, sharing it with many friends and customers.

Saruma henryi was discovered on a Chinese plant collection expedition in the early part of the 1900’s by plant explorerAugustine Henry and named in his honor. Who knows why it took so long to really get itself into cultivation?

Now….back to the taxonomists. Saruma is an anagram of the word Asarum and is a monotypic genus in the Aristolochiaceae family. The Aristolochiaceae family is home to the genus Asarum, the deciduous “Wild Gingers” and Hexastylis, the evergreen “Wild Gingers”. Also, the genus Aristolochia, better known as the “Dutchman’s Pipe”. Our East Coast native, Aristolochia durior, can climb a hundred feet into the top of a tree and makes a really neat spiral around the branches. The flowers resemble little pipes. Check out a picture at –http://farm1.static.flickr.com/193/502038078_48d4084174.jpg?v=0

If you’d like to know more about the fascinating Aristolochiaceae family you can go to the following link –http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/anthophyta/paleoherbs/aristolochiales.html

The best way that I can think of to describe Saruma henryi is a “Wild Ginger on steroids”. The large, velvety, cordate foliage holds up well all the growing season long. For several weeks in mid Summer, it is brilliantly topped with one inch brilliant primrose yellow flowers. I grow it in partial shade and it attains a height of about 12″ – 20″. It seems to have NO insect, pest or disease problems and is 100% deerproof!

I’ve been building a good stock of plants to share with you and now is a good time to plant them.

What you’ll receive are large, 2 year old bareroot plants in full, active growth. They’ll come to you wrapped in long fibered, unmilled sphagnum moss. This material is antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral and a very useful material.

The prices shown below include FREE SHIPPING on bareroot plants out of their 2″ pots. If you would like to receive the plants undisturbed, in their pots, please add .95¢ per plant to cover the extra cost of shipping soil and pots.

7   for $ 35.00  delivered ($5.00 ea)
10  for $ 45.00  delivered ($4.50 ea)
15  for $ 60.00  delivered ($4.00 ea)
20  for $ 70.00  delivered ($3.50 ea)
50  for $150.00  delivered ($3.00 ea)

Larger quantities at even lower prices upon request

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just fill out the order form at http://www.sunfarm.com/orderform.pdf

Smilacina racemosa
Yes, I had to go to the UK to be enlightened about a plant that grew in my own backyard. In my defense, I was so much younger then and much less enlightened. But here’s the short of it. In 1992, my friend Dan Heims and I spent two solid weeks travelling around the UK visiting gardens, plant collections and friends. It was a plantsman’s dream trip starting off with two nights as the guests of Agatha Christie’s daughter, a day with Beth Chatto, a day with Elizabeth Strangman and many other legends of British gardening and culminating with a full day, sun up to sun down, of Dan and I strolling around Wisley with Graham Stuart Thomas just the three of us. (I’d use a few exclamation points here, but I’ve been told that I use too many!)

It was on that trip to England, a gardener’s Nirvana, that a chance drive through the Devon countryside on the way to visit yet another NCCPG collection brought us by a lovely cottage garden. There was a border along the front of the property of what I first thought was some rare Hydrangea species. Now, in the UK, it’s not uncommon for fellow gardeners to stop at a stranger’s garden and strike up a conversation, so I wasn’t surprised when Dan slammed on the brakes again and backed up into yet another person’s driveway. The woman was delighted to have a couple of fellow plant geeks from across the pond admire her plantings and welcomed us into her home and garden. She laughed heartily when I explained to her what initially caught my attention.

Before I could query her as to what the magnificent planting was, she said “That’s one of yours.”

“What do you mean ?” I asked.

“That’s your “False Solomons Seal”, Smilacina racemosa,” she replied.

To avoid further embarrassment on my part for not knowing, I quickly complimented her on her exquisite choice of plant material. So, there you have it! Here was a plant that I’d encountered in the woods behind my home on many occasions and knew quite well, but never realized that if you give it a home in a garden, free from competition with tree roots, weeds, rocks etc and a little TLC, it performs tenfold!!!

Now, about the name of this plant, which by the way is native to every state in the US and all of Canada. Here’s where it gets kinda sticky. As a child, I always knew this plant as “False Solomons Seal”. As I grew up and started speaking Latin, it became Smilacina racemosa to me. The “True Solomon’s Seal” being any one of a number of species in the genus Polygonatum. Now, I come to find that not only have the taxonomists changed the name to Maianthemum racemosum but, I’ve even heard rumors that it was being moved from the Liliaceae family to the Convallariaceae family.

Nevertheless, and with due respect to all the name changes etc, this long lived, easy to grow, almost shrublike in appearance perennial plant will bring you, your friends and your visitors decades of pleasure in your garden. It typically grows in average soil in all types of light conditions from deep shade to filtered sunlight. The deep green, glossy, arching foliage is persistent all the growing season long and the attractive, long lasting, elegant feathery, creamy white blooms light up the whole garden in early to mid Spring. Average height is 12″ – 18″, but I’ve seen mature, well fed plantings attain heights of almost 60″.

And if that weren’t enough, it’s fragrant! And wait till you see the berries it produces in Autumn!!!

Propagation is also quite easy as it forms a new bud along the rhizome every year and can even be easily grown from seed, although it takes several years to reach flowering size from seedlings. As far as the deer and other critters go, they may occasionally take a nip at it, but it’s not on their delicacy list and they pretty much ignore it. There seems to be no insect, pest or disease problems. In fact, I’ve never even observed an aphid on it.

I usually only include one image in my email blasts whilst trying to entice you into trying a new plant, but my friend Ian Cooke sent me four and I couldn’t decide which one I like best. Since they’re great images I’ve decided to share them all with you. Also, THANKS to Jeff Abbas for the great closeup of the flowers. My own images paled in comparison.

I’ve a good bit of Smilacina racemosa or to be taxonomically correct, Maianthemum racemosum, to share with you now. What you’ll receive are bed grown, bareroot rhizomes with a big, fat, juicy bud at the tip that will burst out of the ground next Spring and reward you with brilliant white flowers and beautiful red berries. They’ll be wrapped in long fibered, unmilled sphagnum moss. This material is antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral and a very useful material to recycle.

The prices shown below include FREE SHIPPING!!!

7   for $ 35.00  delivered ($5.00 ea)
10  for $ 45.00  delivered ($4.50 ea)
15  for $ 60.00  delivered ($4.00 ea)
20  for $ 70.00  delivered ($3.50 ea)
50  for $150.00  delivered ($3.00 ea)

 

Larger quantities at even lower prices upon request.

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just download and print our order form and send it along with your check to:

Internet Order Department
Sunshine Farm & Gardens
HC 67 Box 539 B
Renick WV 24966 USA

Solidago caesia
Solidago caesia happens to be one of my very favorite Autumn blooming perennials. The bright, Primrose yellow brilliance of its unusual zig-zag, axillary, long lasting flower heads never fail to garner praise from garden visitors. One of the most commonly asked questions, after I answer the “WOW…what is that?” question is “Doesn’t it make you sneeze?” Poor, poor Goldenrod, taking the heat for Ambrosia artemisiifolia just because it coincidentally shares the same window of time in flowering. Ambrosia artemisiifolia is the dreaded allergen, “Ragweed!” Goldenrod pollen DOES NOT cause an allergic reaction.

Solidago caesia is native to 32 states in the continental US  http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=SOCA4from Maine to Texas and 3 Canadian provinces. That said, I would think it to be hardy just about anywhere. Although its native habitat is shade, it can handle part sun. Moisture requirements are not high and I’ve grown it successfully in average to dryish soil. Plant height is 18″ – 36″ if erect, but it so often assumes a graceful arching habit.

The gargantuan populations of deer that roam these mountains and valleys have never even raised an eyebrow at this plant.

YES, this is a “Goldenrod”, not a weedy Goldenrod, but an extremely desirable one and I highly recommend it for just about any garden. Be it a native, natural, wild or formal garden, there’s a place for Solidago caesia.

I’ve been building a good stock of Solidago caesia to share with you and now is a good time to plant them.

What you’ll receive are large, 2 year old bareroot plants in full, active growth. They’ll come to you with their roots wrapped in long fibered, unmilled sphagnum moss. This material is antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral and a very useful material.

The prices shown below include FREE SHIPPING on bareroot plants out of their 2″ pots. If you would like to receive the plants undisturbed, in their pots, please add .95¢ per plant to cover the extra cost of shipping soil and pots.

7   for $ 35.00  delivered ($5.00 ea)
10  for $ 45.00  delivered ($4.50 ea)
15  for $ 60.00  delivered ($4.00 ea)
20  for $ 70.00  delivered ($3.50 ea)
50  for $150.00  delivered ($3.00 ea)

Larger quantities at even lower prices upon request

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just fill out the order form at http://www.sunfarm.com/orderform.pdf

Spigelia marilandica
Do you love your hummingbirds as much as I do mine, but loathe mixing sugar and water, getting all sticky while attracting every ant in the neighborhood? Do you want your hummingbird population to be healthy, imbibing REAL nectar? Then here’s the plant for you!

Often referred to by the non “Plant Geek” types as “Indian Pink”, this very rare and unusual member of the Loganiaceae family couldn’t be easier to grow.

Spigelia marilandica is a long flowering perennial for sun or shade that has the most unique flowers I’ve ever experienced. The flowers have a panache that’s somewhat indescribable and there isn’t a person on Earth, gardener or not, that could pass it by without stopping to admire and comment on it.

Native to 17 states from Texas to the Carolinas and from Illinois to Florida http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=SPMA3 there most likely isn’t a place in the US that Spigelia wouldn’t thrive. And thrive it will as it is not only extremely perennial, but will seed itself into a show stopping colony in just a few years. Look at the flowers closeup at the Mobot website.

I wish I could report that this delightful plant is one that the deer don’t approve of, but alas, they seem to enjoy its beauty as much as we two legged creatures do. However, it’s certainly worth that small amount of effort to cage or spray it with one of the many effective deer repellent sprays available at any garden center.

Plants grow to about 12″ – 24″ tall and, in a couple of years, will reach a diameter of around the same. I cultivate Spigelia in full sun for maximum flowering and seed production, but the foliage does look a bit better in partial to full shade. Average to well drained soils are the preference. This plant belongs in your garden, and I’ve just about 1000 of my 2″ pots to share with you. Pricing follows for plants shipped in their pots.

3   for $ 25.00
7   for $ 50.00

Shipping via PRIORITY MAIL is FREE!!!

I usually offer larger quantities at lower prices here, but in order to insure that no one misses out, I’ve limited the quantity to 7 plants per person.

 

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just download and print our order form and send it along with your check to:

Internet Order Department
Sunshine Farm & Gardens
HC 67 Box 539 B
Renick WV 24966 USA

Stenanthium gramineum

If you’re looking for a native shade perennial that blooms later in the season, and I mean late and for a long time, then I absolutely have the perfect plant for you!

AKA “Eastern Featherbells”, Stenanthium gramineum is a stunning member of the Melanthiaceae family, the same family as another of my faves, Veratrum viride. It’s native to more than half the US and will grow well in just about any state in the US.

Not only does Stenanthium start blooming in late summer, when there really isn’t much going on, but it keeps on blooming until the killing frosts of October with panicles of pure white flowers over wide, lush, grasslike foliage, on graceful, 36″ – 60″ stems.

I grow Stenanthium in average soil, in full to light shade. However, if you’re going to grow it in full sun, the soil needs to be a bit more moist.

This plant is a “No-Brainer” to grow and a real show stopper in flower.

The prices shown below include FREE SHIPPING via Insured Priority Mail!

3 for $ 25.00 
7 for $ 50.00

Limit 7

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just download and print our order form and send it along with your check to:

Internet Order Department
Sunshine Farm & Gardens 
696 Glicks Rd
Renick WV 24966 USA

Trautvetteria caroliniensis

You Need This Plant In Your Garden, IF……….. 

# 1 – You love the rare and unusual. 

# 2 – You want to grow plants that none of your friends have ever even heard of. 

# 3 – You want to be the envy of all your neighbors. 

# 4 – You don’t have the time or desire to baby or pamper plants. 

# 5 – You have a small amount of shade or dappled sunlight. 

# 6 – You like BOLD foliage. 

# 7 – You’re passionate about growing native plants. 

# 8 – You want an alluring “Conversation Plant” for your garden visitors to chat about. 

# 9 – You’re a resident of Planet Earth. 

# 10 – # 100 – well, there are probably over 100 reasons that you should be growing Trautvetteria caroliniensis, but the main reason that you aren’t growing it is because you’ve probably never heard of it, let alone had someone offer to share some with you.

All that’s about to change. Read on, read on……… 

AKA to some as “Tasslerue”, this easy to grow member of the Ranunculaceae (Buttercup) family makes quite the dramatic statement in the shade garden. In the wild, it prefers moist to sometimes wet soils, but it does well in average garden soil, as long as your soil doesn’t completely turn to dust. I’ve found that a mulch of double ground hardwood bark keeps just about any soil from drying out and ultimately morphs into rich organic matter. This garden treasure does well in deep shade, but even better in bright shade to dappled sunlight. Trautvetteria is considered hardy in zones 5 – 8 and I’d venture to say that’s a conservative estimate as I’ve had them overwinter just fine all the way down to 0 in unprotected pots with no snow cover! Folks on the other end of the spectrum report that it does well even in southern Florida, and why not, it’s a native down there. Actually it’s native to over half of the states in the US. I would suggest full shade if you live in zones 8-10 though. 

Groundcovers aren’t required to be low growing, short plants. The attractive foliage of a Trautvetteria colony makes this plant a great groundcover plant with about 12″ – 18″ of height and an equal spread. In flower, the sturdy stems can reach skyward up to 48″. The long lasting, pure white, early to mid-summer blooming flowers have an interesting, somewhat indescribable, pleasant fragrance. 

The Genus name honors Ernst Rudolf von Trautvetter (1809-1889), a Russian botanist and former director of the Botanical Garden in St. Petersburg. Trautvetteria is a monotypic Genus as T. caroliniensis is its only species. 

Trautvetteria caroliniensis is quite rare in the wild. In fact, it almost brought me that proverbial 15 minutes of fame. You should read the entertaining story that I wrote for “Native Plants Journal” about that episode, you can read it here – STORY

I have about 900 Trautvetteria in my 2″ treeband pots that they’ve called home for the last 4 years to share with you. Pricing follows for plants shipped in their pots Via Insured Priority Mail. 

3  for $ 25.00
7  for $ 50.00

I usually offer larger quantities at lower prices here, but in order to insure that no one misses out, I’ve limited the quantity to 7 plants per person. 

SHIPPING IS FREE!!!

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just download and print our order form and send it along with your check to:

Internet Order Department
Sunshine Farm & Gardens 
HC 67 Box 539 B
Renick WV 24966 USA

Trillium cuneatum

Despite their exotic, magical, mystical appearance, most Trilliums are quite easy to grow and Trillium cuneatum is no exception. There are at least one or more Trillium species native to every state in the US but four. I’ve been growing and propagating many species of Trillium over the last 38 years and the only one that I wouldn’t recommend for the average gardener is the lovely Trillium undulatum as you would really need specific acidic and moisture conditions for this particular species.

You can grow Trilliums from seed, but they take 4-6 years to flower. Another simple way to build up your Trillium collection rapidly is by rhizome division. I plan to put up a “Propagation Information Section” on my web site sometime in the near future, but in the meantime, here’s a visual for you.

Anyway, as far as growing conditions go, most Trillium species prefer woodland conditions, which basically translates as light to medium shade with moisture retentive, but well drained soil. If these conditions don’t exist naturally in your garden, it’s not much of a chore to create them.

Over the past 12 years I’ve been building quite a good stock of my personal favorite Trillium species, Trillium cuneatum, by rhizome division and now have more stock plants than I require. So, I’m offering you the opportunity to grow them in your garden. We’ve taken off our regular 3-5 year divisions and replanted our stock plants in 5″ deep Anderson Treeband® Pots last Autumn and they are reestablishing themselves nicely.

Trillium cuneatum is native to 11 Mid Atlantic and Southeastern states, but is hardy just about anywhere. Here’s a plant that you will instantly fall in love with as its deep burgundy flowers bloom for an extremely long period of time in early to mid Spring. With the most exciting marbled foliage and with no two plants alike, their silvery leaves electrically light up even the shadiest of gardens.

I wish I could say that Trilliums are fully deerproof, however this just isn’t the case. But……… I can honestly say that it’s not their first choice to munch on and in some years they completely ignore them.

Again, they are very easy to grow and will give you and your garden visitors pleasure and enjoyment for many, many years to come.

What you’ll receive this time of year are 5″ deep pots of flowering size, 5 to 7 year old plants in full active growth that have just finished flowering.

I almost always offer free shipping on all bareroot plants, but these plants are just too precious to take a chance with and I recommend that you get them in the pots.

3   for $ 25.00 plus  7.50 for INSURED PRIORITY MAIL
7   for $ 50.00 plus 10.00 for INSURED PRIORITY MAIL OR UPS
12  for $ 75.00 plus 15.00 for INSURED PRIORITY MAIL OR UPS
20  for $100.00 plus 20.00 for INSURED PRIORITY MAIL OR UPS

I usually offer even lower prices for larger quantities here, but must limit purchases to 20 per person on this particular plant.

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just fill out the order form at http://www.sunfarm.com/orderform.pdf

Trillium grandiflorum

Trilliums just have to be the most beloved wildflower of any native or non-native plants that I can think of. Many folks that I chat plants with, remember them fondly from childhood walks in the woods with their grandparents. Trilliums are very easy to grow and are a long lived perennial plant whose size can double every year when taken proper care of. Proper care means, just keeping them weeded and fed with a good perennial plant food and mulched to keep them from totally drying out during dry spells – that’s all there is to it.

Over the years, I’ve seen them offered by some of the major mailorder garden retailers such as Wayside Gardens and White Flower Farm for exorbitant prices of up to $30.00 each, with the justification that they were difficult to propagate. That myth couldn’t be further from the truth! While the time span required to achieve a mature flowering plant from seed can be as long as 7 years, rhizome propagation is much quicker, easier and more fruitful. And I know from experience, as I’ve spent the last 30 plus years building production stock beds of well over 100,000 Trillium plants.

I’ve been busy filling a pipeline with many species in the genus Trillium, mainly the most popular and well known, Trillium grandiflorum, (landscape photos above and to the right), but also large production blocks of many other species such as T. erectum, T. cuneatum, T. luteum, T. recurvatumand T. pusillum (flower close up above) with its delicate ruffled edges and purple flower backs.

There’s a whole host of companion plants that Trilliums are right at home with, plants like Arisaema, Jeffersonia, Uvularia, Hellebores, Hepatica’s, Ferns and ………well, just use your imagination.

And now that the pipeline is full, I can offer you flowering age Trillium grandiflorum at a price that won’t have you taking out a second mortgage on your home. I also have ample stock on several of the other species mentioned and if you’re interested in any of them, just email me for details. You can have Trillium grandiflorum growing magnificently in your own garden at the very reasonable prices listed below. What you’ll get are mature flowering age rhizomes that were actually my stock plants this year and have been propagated by rhizome division. I’ll carefully wrap them for their journey to your garden in long fibered, unmilled sphagnum moss. This material is antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral and a very useful material to recycle. 

The prices shown below include FREE SHIPPING.

7  for $ 35.00 delivered ($5.00 ea)
10 for $ 45.00 delivered ($4.50 ea)
15 for $ 60.00 delivered ($4.00 ea)
20 for $ 70.00 delivered ($3.50 ea)
50 for $150.00 delivered ($3.00 ea)

 

Larger quantities at even lower prices upon request.

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just fill out the order form at http://www.sunfarm.com/orderform.pdf or download and print our order form and send it along with your check to:

Internet Order Department
Sunshine Farm & Gardens 
HC 67 Box 539 B
Renick WV 24966 USA

Trillium luteum

Luxurious Lovable Lemony Looks…. and fragrant to boot!!!

With their bright yellow flowers in early to mid Spring and silvery marbled foliage, Trillium luteum is one plant whose fragrance matches its exotic looks. Their aroma can only be described as a lemony, jasmine scent that creates an intoxicating, fragrant cloud which lasts for quite a while as the flowers are very long lived. You don’t even have to get down on your hands and knees to imbibe them, as even on a still day, the air is filled with its presence.

One would think that a plant with such an extraordinary appearance, would be difficult and demanding, but quite the contrary. Trillium luteum is an extremely easy plant to grow in virtually any garden. All you need is “Woodland Conditions”, so let me describe that term for you. It’s simple to understand – full to bright shade is one aspect and average to well drained soil is another.

I wish I could report that this charming plant is 100&perc; deerproof, but that would be an untruth. Fact is, it doesn’t seem to be at the top of Bambi’s wish list like Trillium grandiflorum is, but they do sometimes nibble at them. So if your garden isn’t fenced from a pack of ravenous venison, you can resort to one of the many effective deer repellents that are on the market.

Depending on soil conditions, this species can reach heights of over 18″. The ones in my garden are about 12″ – 15″ tall, some with leaves over 4″ long.

Trillium luteum is native to most of the Southeastern US, MI and ON in Canada. It’s hardiness has never been in question and they haven’t even batted an eye at -20F here. As far as heat tolerance goes, I would say that it can handle anything short of Death Valley CA, given full shade in the deep South or any other areas that climb into the triple digits.

Good companion plants are just about any species of Ferns, Hostas (if you don’t have a deer problem) and any other shade loving plant.

There’s a very interesting story about the scientific classification of this species and Trilliums in general at the US Forest Service website – http://www.fs.fed.us/wildflowers/plant-of-the-week/trillium_luteum.shtml

And here’s a delightful story about Trilliums that’s a MUST read by my friend Cole Burrell – http://www.mtcubacenter.org/images/symposium-files/Burrell-Cole.pdf

The flowering size and age plants I’m offering you here are 8-10 years old and have been propagated from rhizome division, a very easy method of increasing your Trillium populations, as seed propagated Trillium can take 7 years to produce a flowering size plant.

I have just over 500 of my 8-10 year old flowering size Trillium luteum to share with you. I’ll carefully wrap them for their journey to your garden in long fibered, unmilled sphagnum moss. This material is antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral and a very useful material to recycle.

Pricing follows below:

1  for $ 15.00 
3  for $ 40.00 
5  for $ 60.00 
10 for $ 95.00

Shipping is FREE in a padded, bubble wrap envelope via First Class Mail, but…….adding $4.95 to your order will cover the cost of Insured Priority Mail and you’ll have them 2 days after I receive your check.

In order to be fair, I can’t sell more than 10 to any one person. I’ll have another crop ready to go next year and hope to keep the pipeline full, so don’t fret if you miss out this year.

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just fill out the order form at http://www.sunfarm.com/orderform.pdf

Uvularia grandiflora

The long lasting flowers of Uvularia grandiflora are something I really look forward to every Spring. And every Spring, my robust stand of “Large Flowered Bellwort” slowly opens their large, pendulous, bright golden yellow flowers that resemble inverted flowing candle flames. Average plant height is about 18″ – 24″ and the medium green foliage of the plant provides a perfect foil for the unusually shaped flowers. 

The name Uvularia comes from a part of the human anatomy, the Uvula, which is that funny little appendage hanging down at the back of your throat. Can you see the resemblance? Isn’t botanical nomenclature easy? I find it curious that the majority of people queried confuse the word Uvula with the word Vulva, another part of the human anatomy………. 

Uvularia grandiflora is a very long lived, hardy perennial and is easily grown in average, medium, well-drained soil in part to full shade. In nature, it occurs in moist, humusy soil in part shade and is native to more than half of the US and Canada – http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=UVGR 

Hardiness is USDA Zones 4-10 with full shade a must in the deep south. 

It’s an excellent companion plant for Hostas, Hellebores, Arisaemas and Trilliums. The list goes on and on.

I wish that I could say that they’re 100% deerproof, but on ocassion, a curious young fawn may take a nibble. Different deer populations have different tastes and may completely ignore them. I’m also building up a nice supply of two other native Uvularia species, Uvularia sessilifolia and Uvularia perfoliata. These species are smaller in stature, but equally as showy and are perfect for a shady rock garden, along a path or in the front of a shade border. I hope to have them available next Spring. In the meantime…………. 

I’ve built a nice stock of 5 year old flowering size Uvularia grandiflora and I know that they’ll make a great addition to your garden and will bring you the same pleasure that they bring me every Spring for many, many years to come. 

The prices shown below include FREE SHIPPING via Insured Priority Mail on bareroot plants.

3  for $ 25.00 delivered ($8.35 ea)
7  for $ 50.00 delivered ($7.15 ea)
12 for $ 75.00 delivered ($6.25 ea)
20 for $100.00 delivered ($5.00 ea)

 

Ordering couldn’t be easier! Just fill out the order form at http://www.sunfarm.com/orderform.pdf or download and print our order form and send it along with your check to:

Internet Order Department
Sunshine Farm & Gardens 
HC 67 Box 539 B
Renick WV 24966 USA

Sign me up for Specials!